Posts Tagged: Text + Documents

Karl Haendel, Long Black Coat, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm), 2012 (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Three, 2013,” Natilee Harren looks at artist Karl Haendel’s practice of appropriation within the context of today’s image culture. This is the third and final part of her essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Karl Haendel, Long Black Coat, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm), 2012 (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Three, 2013,” Natilee Harren looks at artist Karl Haendel’s practice of appropriation within the context of today’s image culture. This is the third and final part of her essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Jeremy Wood,  Data Cloud, 2008, . GPS sculpture (artwork © Jeremy Wood)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #3

by Mike Maizels

As the first pair of artists in this series examined the semantics of local places, and the second explored the possibility of picturing the world in totality, both artists in the final pairing investigate the question of geographic epistemology—how do the materials facts of the external world become the objects of systematic human understanding?

Jeremy Wood,  Data Cloud, 2008, . GPS sculpture (artwork © Jeremy Wood)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #3

by Mike Maizels

As the first pair of artists in this series examined the semantics of local places, and the second explored the possibility of picturing the world in totality, both artists in the final pairing investigate the question of geographic epistemology—how do the materials facts of the external world become the objects of systematic human understanding?

Shawn Brixey, Epicycle (2000). (© Shawn Brixey)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #2

By Mike Maizels
Mike Maizels examines Shawn Brixey’s Epicycle (2000) and Robert Smithson’s Pointless Vanishing Point (1967) in the second installment of The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0.

Shawn Brixey, Epicycle (2000). (© Shawn Brixey)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #2

By Mike Maizels
Mike Maizels examines Shawn Brixey’s Epicycle (2000) and Robert Smithson’s Pointless Vanishing Point (1967) in the second installment of The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0.

John Luther Adams, The Place Where You Go to Listen, 2008, sound and light environment, installation view, Museum of the North, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2008–present (artwork © John Luther Adams; photograph by Barry McWayne provided by Museum of the North)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0

By Mike Maizels
The apologists for “Big Data” seem to be everywhere these days. In forums ranging from TED talks to marketing campaigns, we are now being bombarded by the just-on-the-horizon possibilities of Total Information. It is no surprise that a particular articulation of these ideas has also surfaced in the world of contemporary art practice.

John Luther Adams, The Place Where You Go to Listen, 2008, sound and light environment, installation view, Museum of the North, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2008–present (artwork © John Luther Adams; photograph by Barry McWayne provided by Museum of the North)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0

By Mike Maizels
The apologists for “Big Data” seem to be everywhere these days. In forums ranging from TED talks to marketing campaigns, we are now being bombarded by the just-on-the-horizon possibilities of Total Information. It is no surprise that a particular articulation of these ideas has also surfaced in the world of contemporary art practice.