Posts Tagged: Texts + Documents

Anna Craycroft, The Earth Is a Magnet, 2016, installation view, part of The Artist’s Museum, Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, November 16, 2016–March 26, 2017 (artwork © Anna Craycroft; photograph by Charles Mayer)

To Record, to Interpret, to Comment

By Anna Craycroft

In “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment,” Brookyn–based artist Anna Craycroft asks readers to reconsider how we come to know what we think we know about the history of modernist photography and the photographer Berenice Abbott, which draws from Craycroft’s extensive research into Abbott’s writings, photographs, letters, inventions, and other archival materials.

Anna Craycroft, The Earth Is a Magnet, 2016, installation view, part of The Artist’s Museum, Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, November 16, 2016–March 26, 2017 (artwork © Anna Craycroft; photograph by Charles Mayer)

To Record, to Interpret, to Comment

By Anna Craycroft

In “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment,” Brookyn–based artist Anna Craycroft asks readers to reconsider how we come to know what we think we know about the history of modernist photography and the photographer Berenice Abbott, which draws from Craycroft’s extensive research into Abbott’s writings, photographs, letters, inventions, and other archival materials.

Karl Haendel, Man, 2010, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Three, 2013,” the third and final part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Karl Haendel, Man, 2010, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Three, 2013,” the third and final part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Karl Haendel, Knight #2, 2010, pencil on paper, 103 x 74 in. (261.6 x 187.9 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Two” of her three-part essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation,” Natilee Harren explores appropriation, artistic heritage, and medieval suits of armor through the context of an encounter between Karl Haendel and an artist of an earlier generation, Robert Longo.

Karl Haendel, Knight #2, 2010, pencil on paper, 103 x 74 in. (261.6 x 187.9 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Two” of her three-part essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation,” Natilee Harren explores appropriation, artistic heritage, and medieval suits of armor through the context of an encounter between Karl Haendel and an artist of an earlier generation, Robert Longo.

Penelope Umbrico, Sunset Portraits, 2011, images from Flickr (artwork © Penelope Umbrico)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Two, 2012,” the second part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Penelope Umbrico, Sunset Portraits, 2011, images from Flickr (artwork © Penelope Umbrico)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Two, 2012,” the second part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Karl Haendel working in his studio, 2001 (photograph © Florian Maier-Aichen)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000

By Natilee Harren

In Natilee Harren’s three-part essay series on issues of appropriation and artistic heritage, she examines episodes in the work of the Los Angeles–based artist Karl Haendel. In “Episode One,” Harren looks closely at Haendel’s Knight’s Heritage, 1963 (2001), which he made as a graduate student, and how it relates to the career and work of the sculptor Anne Truitt (1921–2004). Haendel made his work, a reconstruction of a 1963 work by Truitt, based on photographs, without ever having seen the Truitt sculpture itself.

Karl Haendel working in his studio, 2001 (photograph © Florian Maier-Aichen)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000

By Natilee Harren

In Natilee Harren’s three-part essay series on issues of appropriation and artistic heritage, she examines episodes in the work of the Los Angeles–based artist Karl Haendel. In “Episode One,” Harren looks closely at Haendel’s Knight’s Heritage, 1963 (2001), which he made as a graduate student, and how it relates to the career and work of the sculptor Anne Truitt (1921–2004). Haendel made his work, a reconstruction of a 1963 work by Truitt, based on photographs, without ever having seen the Truitt sculpture itself.

Karl Haendel, Knight’s Heritage, 1963, from the series For/After Anne Truitt,
2001, acrylic on wood, 60-1/2 x 60-1/2 x 12 in. (153.7 x 153.7 x 30.5 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000”

By Nate Harrison

Nate Harrison responds to “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One” by Natilee Harren.

Karl Haendel, Knight’s Heritage, 1963, from the series For/After Anne Truitt,
2001, acrylic on wood, 60-1/2 x 60-1/2 x 12 in. (153.7 x 153.7 x 30.5 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000”

By Nate Harrison

Nate Harrison responds to “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One” by Natilee Harren.