Karl Haendel, Long Black Coat, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm), 2012 (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Three, 2013,” Natilee Harren looks at artist Karl Haendel’s practice of appropriation within the context of today’s image culture. This is the third and final part of her essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Karl Haendel, Long Black Coat, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm), 2012 (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Three, 2013,” Natilee Harren looks at artist Karl Haendel’s practice of appropriation within the context of today’s image culture. This is the third and final part of her essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Karl Haendel, Man, 2010, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Three, 2013,” the third and final part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Karl Haendel, Man, 2010, pencil on paper, 92 x 45 in. (233.6 x 114.3 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Three, 2013,” the third and final part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Isaac Julien, Western Union: Small Boats, 2007, three-screen projection, 35mm color film, DVD/HD transfer, 5.1 SR sound, 18 min. 22 sec., edition of 5, installation view, Metro Pictures, New York, 2007 (artwork © Isaac Julien; photograph provided by Metro Pictures, New York)

Small Boats, Slave Ship; or, Isaac Julien and the Beauty of Implied Catastrophe

By Emma Chubb

Three horizontal screens stretch across two gallery walls, suspended from the ceiling and hung in a slight arc. At first, the two flanking screens remain dark and only the center screen is illuminated. It shows an expanse of blue water, waves rippling with gold and reflecting the setting sun as they gently curl forward onto a barely visible beach.

Isaac Julien, Western Union: Small Boats, 2007, three-screen projection, 35mm color film, DVD/HD transfer, 5.1 SR sound, 18 min. 22 sec., edition of 5, installation view, Metro Pictures, New York, 2007 (artwork © Isaac Julien; photograph provided by Metro Pictures, New York)

Small Boats, Slave Ship; or, Isaac Julien and the Beauty of Implied Catastrophe

By Emma Chubb

Three horizontal screens stretch across two gallery walls, suspended from the ceiling and hung in a slight arc. At first, the two flanking screens remain dark and only the center screen is illuminated. It shows an expanse of blue water, waves rippling with gold and reflecting the setting sun as they gently curl forward onto a barely visible beach.

James Walsh's Critical Bibliography

The Arctic Plants of New York City: An Annotated Bibliography

By James Walsh

I’ve been working since 2008 on a long, complex project centered on plants that grow in both the arctic (I always use the lowercase) and New York City, of which there are a surprising number. Along with identifying and pressing these plants, I’ve been reading eighteenth-century herbals and floras and more recent works on edible plants and botany generally, and have had a particular interest in mental travel and in writers who combine botany and literature.

James Walsh's Critical Bibliography

The Arctic Plants of New York City: An Annotated Bibliography

By James Walsh

I’ve been working since 2008 on a long, complex project centered on plants that grow in both the arctic (I always use the lowercase) and New York City, of which there are a surprising number. Along with identifying and pressing these plants, I’ve been reading eighteenth-century herbals and floras and more recent works on edible plants and botany generally, and have had a particular interest in mental travel and in writers who combine botany and literature.

Karl Haendel, Knight #2, 2010, pencil on paper, 103 x 74 in. (261.6 x 187.9 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Two” of her three-part essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation,” Natilee Harren explores appropriation, artistic heritage, and medieval suits of armor through the context of an encounter between Karl Haendel and an artist of an earlier generation, Robert Longo.

Karl Haendel, Knight #2, 2010, pencil on paper, 103 x 74 in. (261.6 x 187.9 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Two” of her three-part essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation,” Natilee Harren explores appropriation, artistic heritage, and medieval suits of armor through the context of an encounter between Karl Haendel and an artist of an earlier generation, Robert Longo.

Penelope Umbrico, Sunset Portraits, 2011, images from Flickr (artwork © Penelope Umbrico)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Two, 2012,” the second part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Penelope Umbrico, Sunset Portraits, 2011, images from Flickr (artwork © Penelope Umbrico)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Two, 2012,” the second part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

A training session at the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon. Four sessions led by experienced Wikipedians were offered throughout the day. (photograph © Chelsea Spengemann)

Wikipedia Needs You, But Do You Need Wikipedia?

By Chelsea Spengemann

Chelsea Spengemann on the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon held at the Museum of Modern Art on March 5, 2016.

A training session at the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon. Four sessions led by experienced Wikipedians were offered throughout the day. (photograph © Chelsea Spengemann)

Wikipedia Needs You, But Do You Need Wikipedia?

By Chelsea Spengemann

Chelsea Spengemann on the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon held at the Museum of Modern Art on March 5, 2016.

Jongwoo Jeremy Kim's Bookshelf (photograph © Jongwoo Jeremy Kim)

Bookshelf: Jongwoo Jeremy Kim

For this new installment of Art Journal Open Bookshelf, Jongwoo Jeremy Kim shares his reading list.

Jongwoo Jeremy Kim's Bookshelf (photograph © Jongwoo Jeremy Kim)

Bookshelf: Jongwoo Jeremy Kim

For this new installment of Art Journal Open Bookshelf, Jongwoo Jeremy Kim shares his reading list.

Elodie Evers, Magdalena Holzhey, and Gregor Jansen, eds., Leben mit Pop

Leaving Düsseldorf

By Godfre Leung

Godfre Leung reviews Sabine Breitwieser, Laura J. Hoptman, Michael Darling, and Jeffrey D. Grove, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, and the exhibition Isa Genzken: Retrospective; Kathy Halbreich, ed., Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010, and the exhibition Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010; and Elodie Evers, Magdalena Holzhey, and Gregor Jansen, eds., Leben mit Pop and the exhibition Leben mit Pop.

Elodie Evers, Magdalena Holzhey, and Gregor Jansen, eds., Leben mit Pop

Leaving Düsseldorf

By Godfre Leung

Godfre Leung reviews Sabine Breitwieser, Laura J. Hoptman, Michael Darling, and Jeffrey D. Grove, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, and the exhibition Isa Genzken: Retrospective; Kathy Halbreich, ed., Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010, and the exhibition Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010; and Elodie Evers, Magdalena Holzhey, and Gregor Jansen, eds., Leben mit Pop and the exhibition Leben mit Pop.

Gert Jan Kocken, Depictions of Berlin, 1933–1945, 2010, C-print, 118⅛ x 169⅜ in. (300 x 430 cm), installation view, Rijksakademie Open Studios, Netherlands, 2011 (artwork © Gert Jan Kocken; photograph provided by the artist)

Against Infographics

By Daniel Rosenberg

When design is excellent, graphics reveal data, writes the infographics guru Edward Tufte. Good information graphics allow the reader to see relationships not apparent in data without visual form. In principle, such graphics do not impose interpretations but, by showing relationships, make interpretations possible.

Gert Jan Kocken, Depictions of Berlin, 1933–1945, 2010, C-print, 118⅛ x 169⅜ in. (300 x 430 cm), installation view, Rijksakademie Open Studios, Netherlands, 2011 (artwork © Gert Jan Kocken; photograph provided by the artist)

Against Infographics

By Daniel Rosenberg

When design is excellent, graphics reveal data, writes the infographics guru Edward Tufte. Good information graphics allow the reader to see relationships not apparent in data without visual form. In principle, such graphics do not impose interpretations but, by showing relationships, make interpretations possible.

Karl Haendel, Books with Ampersands #3 (For Your Own Good), 2013, enamel and pencil on paper, 40 x 26 in. (101.6 x 66 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Introducing a Three-Part Project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present a three-part, three-author project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison.

Karl Haendel, Books with Ampersands #3 (For Your Own Good), 2013, enamel and pencil on paper, 40 x 26 in. (101.6 x 66 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Introducing a Three-Part Project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present a three-part, three-author project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison.

Karl Haendel working in his studio, 2001 (photograph © Florian Maier-Aichen)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000

By Natilee Harren

In Natilee Harren’s three-part essay series on issues of appropriation and artistic heritage, she examines episodes in the work of the Los Angeles–based artist Karl Haendel. In “Episode One,” Harren looks closely at Haendel’s Knight’s Heritage, 1963 (2001), which he made as a graduate student, and how it relates to the career and work of the sculptor Anne Truitt (1921–2004). Haendel made his work, a reconstruction of a 1963 work by Truitt, based on photographs, without ever having seen the Truitt sculpture itself.

Karl Haendel working in his studio, 2001 (photograph © Florian Maier-Aichen)

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000

By Natilee Harren

In Natilee Harren’s three-part essay series on issues of appropriation and artistic heritage, she examines episodes in the work of the Los Angeles–based artist Karl Haendel. In “Episode One,” Harren looks closely at Haendel’s Knight’s Heritage, 1963 (2001), which he made as a graduate student, and how it relates to the career and work of the sculptor Anne Truitt (1921–2004). Haendel made his work, a reconstruction of a 1963 work by Truitt, based on photographs, without ever having seen the Truitt sculpture itself.

sample layout of GIF placement of pop out window_SMALL

Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately)

By Karl Haendel

Artist Karl Haendel has been creating an archive of 35mm slides since 2000, composed of found images and photographs. The approximately 10,000 slides are organized into more than 250 categories and subcategories (from the W section: Wedding Geometry, Weapons, White House, World War I), and some of these slides become the basis for his drawings. Though this archive exists in analogue form, Haendel recognized that the popular GIF format functions in a similar manner to that of the slide projector, and thus created a digital slideshow experience of these source images for Art Journal Open. To view Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately), click on the image inside this post to launch the project.

sample layout of GIF placement of pop out window_SMALL

Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately)

By Karl Haendel

Artist Karl Haendel has been creating an archive of 35mm slides since 2000, composed of found images and photographs. The approximately 10,000 slides are organized into more than 250 categories and subcategories (from the W section: Wedding Geometry, Weapons, White House, World War I), and some of these slides become the basis for his drawings. Though this archive exists in analogue form, Haendel recognized that the popular GIF format functions in a similar manner to that of the slide projector, and thus created a digital slideshow experience of these source images for Art Journal Open. To view Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately), click on the image inside this post to launch the project.

Karl Haendel, Knight’s Heritage, 1963, from the series For/After Anne Truitt,
2001, acrylic on wood, 60-1/2 x 60-1/2 x 12 in. (153.7 x 153.7 x 30.5 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000”

By Nate Harrison

Nate Harrison responds to “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One” by Natilee Harren.

Karl Haendel, Knight’s Heritage, 1963, from the series For/After Anne Truitt,
2001, acrylic on wood, 60-1/2 x 60-1/2 x 12 in. (153.7 x 153.7 x 30.5 cm) (artwork © Karl Haendel)

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000”

By Nate Harrison

Nate Harrison responds to “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One” by Natilee Harren.

Christopher Reed's books (photograph © Christopher Reed)

Bookshelf: Christopher Reed

Christopher Reed shares what he’s reading in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Christopher Reed's books (photograph © Christopher Reed)

Bookshelf: Christopher Reed

Christopher Reed shares what he’s reading in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Sociological Art Collective (from left to right: Fred Forest, Hervé Fischer, Jean-Paul Thénot) at the 37th Biennale di Venezia, 1976  (photo © Sociological Art Collective, archives: Hervé Fischer)

Update from the European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum

European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum shares a News & Notes update on their recent activities.

Sociological Art Collective (from left to right: Fred Forest, Hervé Fischer, Jean-Paul Thénot) at the 37th Biennale di Venezia, 1976  (photo © Sociological Art Collective, archives: Hervé Fischer)

Update from the European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum

European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum shares a News & Notes update on their recent activities.

Queer Caucus for Art's new website.

Update from the Queer Caucus for Art

New in News & Notes: An update from the Queer Caucus for Art.

Queer Caucus for Art's new website.

Update from the Queer Caucus for Art

New in News & Notes: An update from the Queer Caucus for Art.

Derek Conrad Murray's Bookshelf (photograph © Derek Conrad Murray)

Bookshelf: Derek Conrad Murray

Derek Conrad Murray shares his reading list in this week’s Art Journal Open Bookshelf.

Derek Conrad Murray's Bookshelf (photograph © Derek Conrad Murray)

Bookshelf: Derek Conrad Murray

Derek Conrad Murray shares his reading list in this week’s Art Journal Open Bookshelf.

Photo of panelists at the Society of Contemporary Art Historian's panel, Histories and Economies of Contemporary Art, which was held  at the College Art Association 103rd Annual Conference in New York, on February 11, 2015 (photograph by Bradley Marks)

Report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians

The newest installment of News & Notes is a report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians.

Photo of panelists at the Society of Contemporary Art Historian's panel, Histories and Economies of Contemporary Art, which was held  at the College Art Association 103rd Annual Conference in New York, on February 11, 2015 (photograph by Bradley Marks)

Report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians

The newest installment of News & Notes is a report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians.

Center for Land Use Interpretation and the Institute for Marking and Measuring, Centers of the USA, 2013, field west of Twin Tops Mountain, South Dakota (photograph by CLUI published under a Creative Commons A-NC-SA license, creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/legalcode)
The site is calculated to be the present geographic center of the United States. Other centers marked in the project include a spot in Kansas that is the center of the forty-eight contiguous states, the town of Plato, Missouri, that is the population center of the United States, a lake in North Dakota that is calculated to be the geographic center of North America, and a field in Wisconsin that lies at the intersection of 45° North and 90° West and is thus the center of the northwest quadrant of the globe. http://clui.org/page/center-continguous-united-states

Rewilding: An Emerging History of Common Field

By James McAnally

Common Field was born of a singular moment, a shared time of simmering scarcity matched with an abundance of artist-centric models springing up globally. The emergent network is quickly becoming a central figure within a spectrum of new alternative forms increasingly coming to define a deflated decade.

Center for Land Use Interpretation and the Institute for Marking and Measuring, Centers of the USA, 2013, field west of Twin Tops Mountain, South Dakota (photograph by CLUI published under a Creative Commons A-NC-SA license, creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/legalcode)
The site is calculated to be the present geographic center of the United States. Other centers marked in the project include a spot in Kansas that is the center of the forty-eight contiguous states, the town of Plato, Missouri, that is the population center of the United States, a lake in North Dakota that is calculated to be the geographic center of North America, and a field in Wisconsin that lies at the intersection of 45° North and 90° West and is thus the center of the northwest quadrant of the globe. http://clui.org/page/center-continguous-united-states

Rewilding: An Emerging History of Common Field

By James McAnally

Common Field was born of a singular moment, a shared time of simmering scarcity matched with an abundance of artist-centric models springing up globally. The emergent network is quickly becoming a central figure within a spectrum of new alternative forms increasingly coming to define a deflated decade.

Parul Dave-Mukherji, Naman P. Ahuja, and Kavita Singh, eds., InFlux: Contemporary Art in Asia

Barbarians at the Gates: Contemporary Art and Globalization in Asia

By Sonal Khullar
Sonal Khullar reviews InFlux: Contemporary Art in Asia edited by Parul Dave-Mukherji, Naman P. Ahuja, and Kavita Singh.

Parul Dave-Mukherji, Naman P. Ahuja, and Kavita Singh, eds., InFlux: Contemporary Art in Asia

Barbarians at the Gates: Contemporary Art and Globalization in Asia

By Sonal Khullar
Sonal Khullar reviews InFlux: Contemporary Art in Asia edited by Parul Dave-Mukherji, Naman P. Ahuja, and Kavita Singh.

Math Bass, Installation view of Math Bass: Off the Clock, MoMA PS1, New York, 2015 (artwork © Math Bass, photograph by Pablo Enriquez)

The Body is a Location: Math Bass in Conversation with Mia Locks

By Mia Locks

Curator Mia Locks speaks with artist Math Bass about ambiguity, body movement, and the recent exhibition of Bass’s work that Locks curated, Math Bass: Off the Clock, which was on view at MoMA PS1 from May 3 to September 7, 2015.

Math Bass, Installation view of Math Bass: Off the Clock, MoMA PS1, New York, 2015 (artwork © Math Bass, photograph by Pablo Enriquez)

The Body is a Location: Math Bass in Conversation with Mia Locks

By Mia Locks

Curator Mia Locks speaks with artist Math Bass about ambiguity, body movement, and the recent exhibition of Bass’s work that Locks curated, Math Bass: Off the Clock, which was on view at MoMA PS1 from May 3 to September 7, 2015.

Suzanne Preston Blier's Bookshelf (image © Suzanne Preston Blier)

Bookshelf: Suzanne Preston Blier

In the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf project, Suzanne Preston Blier shares what she’s been reading.

Suzanne Preston Blier's Bookshelf (image © Suzanne Preston Blier)

Bookshelf: Suzanne Preston Blier

In the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf project, Suzanne Preston Blier shares what she’s been reading.

Lareese Hall's "Work" Bookshelf (photograph © Lareese Hall)

Bookshelf: Lareese Hall

Lareese Hall shares her “work” and “life” bookshelves in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Lareese Hall's "Work" Bookshelf (photograph © Lareese Hall)

Bookshelf: Lareese Hall

Lareese Hall shares her “work” and “life” bookshelves in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

From “Neatline: Syllabus as Interactive Visualization”  by Caroline Bruzelius and Hannah Jacobs. Introduction to Art History, Unit 2, Lecture 1: Prehistory: Paleolithic. Lectures contain readings, dates, spatial coverage, lecture slides, maps providing historical context, and other relevant information (image created by Wired! Lab at Duke University)

How Have New Technologies Shaped the Introductory Art History Classroom? Why Does It Matter? An Update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology

Art Journal Open’s News & Notes section launches with an update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology.

From “Neatline: Syllabus as Interactive Visualization”  by Caroline Bruzelius and Hannah Jacobs. Introduction to Art History, Unit 2, Lecture 1: Prehistory: Paleolithic. Lectures contain readings, dates, spatial coverage, lecture slides, maps providing historical context, and other relevant information (image created by Wired! Lab at Duke University)

How Have New Technologies Shaped the Introductory Art History Classroom? Why Does It Matter? An Update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology

Art Journal Open’s News & Notes section launches with an update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology.

Paul A. Ranogajec's Bookshelf

Bookshelf: Paul A. Ranogajec

Paul A. Ranogajec shares his reading list in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Paul A. Ranogajec's Bookshelf

Bookshelf: Paul A. Ranogajec

Paul A. Ranogajec shares his reading list in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Giuliana Bruno,  Surface: Matters of Aesthetics, Materiality, and Media

Superficial Thinking: Screen Practices and Screen Architectures

By Swagato Chakravorty
Swagato Chakravorty reviews Surface: Matters of Aesthetics, Materiality, and Media by Giuliana Bruno.

Giuliana Bruno,  Surface: Matters of Aesthetics, Materiality, and Media

Superficial Thinking: Screen Practices and Screen Architectures

By Swagato Chakravorty
Swagato Chakravorty reviews Surface: Matters of Aesthetics, Materiality, and Media by Giuliana Bruno.

robbinschilds, Construction IV: Olive Room, 2011, two-channel digital video and audio installation, 15 min. (artwork © robbinschilds)

Two for One: robbinschilds in conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch

In the final installment of her three-part interview series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with robbinschilds about site, collaboration, and the process of creating Constructions I–IV, which was commissioned for the 2011 exhibition Temporary Structures: Performing Architecture in Contemporary Art at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum.

robbinschilds, Construction IV: Olive Room, 2011, two-channel digital video and audio installation, 15 min. (artwork © robbinschilds)

Two for One: robbinschilds in conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch

In the final installment of her three-part interview series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with robbinschilds about site, collaboration, and the process of creating Constructions I–IV, which was commissioned for the 2011 exhibition Temporary Structures: Performing Architecture in Contemporary Art at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum.

Judith Rodenbeck's Bookshelf (photograph © Judith Rodenbeck)

Bookshelf: Judith Rodenbeck

Judith Rodenbeck shares her summer reading in the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Judith Rodenbeck's Bookshelf (photograph © Judith Rodenbeck)

Bookshelf: Judith Rodenbeck

Judith Rodenbeck shares her summer reading in the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

The library at the Artsy offices, New York (photograph © Matthew Israel)

Bookshelf: Matthew Israel

In this week’s Bookshelf, Matthew Israel shares what he’s reading.

The library at the Artsy offices, New York (photograph © Matthew Israel)

Bookshelf: Matthew Israel

In this week’s Bookshelf, Matthew Israel shares what he’s reading.

Steven Nelson's Bookshelf

Bookshelf: Steven Nelson

Steven Nelson shares what’s on his bookshelf.

Steven Nelson's Bookshelf

Bookshelf: Steven Nelson

Steven Nelson shares what’s on his bookshelf.

Carolee Schneemann, Kitch’s Last Meal, 1973–76, Super 8mm film, double projection, vertical, sound on cassette, ca. 5 hrs., two installation views (artwork © Carolee Schneemann; photographs provided by the artist)

“The Cat Is My Medium”: Notes on the Writing and Art of Carolee Schneemann

By Thyrza Nichols Goodeve

For several years, Carolee Schneemann has presented an ever-evolving performative lecture about her work, starting with drawings she made at the ages of four and seven. I first saw it in 2009 at St. Mark’s Church.

Carolee Schneemann, Kitch’s Last Meal, 1973–76, Super 8mm film, double projection, vertical, sound on cassette, ca. 5 hrs., two installation views (artwork © Carolee Schneemann; photographs provided by the artist)

“The Cat Is My Medium”: Notes on the Writing and Art of Carolee Schneemann

By Thyrza Nichols Goodeve

For several years, Carolee Schneemann has presented an ever-evolving performative lecture about her work, starting with drawings she made at the ages of four and seven. I first saw it in 2009 at St. Mark’s Church.

Sharon Kivland 's Freud on Holiday books

Not Getting There Is Half the Fun: Holidays with Freud

By Elizabeth Legge

Elizabeth Legge reviews Sharon Kivland’s Freud on Holiday series.

Sharon Kivland 's Freud on Holiday books

Not Getting There Is Half the Fun: Holidays with Freud

By Elizabeth Legge

Elizabeth Legge reviews Sharon Kivland’s Freud on Holiday series.

Megan A. Sullivan's Bookshelf (photograph © Megan A. Sullivan)

Bookshelf: Megan A. Sullivan

Megan A. Sullivan shares her summer reading list in this week’s Bookshelf.

Megan A. Sullivan's Bookshelf (photograph © Megan A. Sullivan)

Bookshelf: Megan A. Sullivan

Megan A. Sullivan shares her summer reading list in this week’s Bookshelf.

Lenore Chinn's Bookshelf (photograph  © Lenore Chinn)

Bookshelf: Lenore Chinn

For the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series, artist Lenore Chinn shares the books on her shelf.

Lenore Chinn's Bookshelf (photograph  © Lenore Chinn)

Bookshelf: Lenore Chinn

For the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series, artist Lenore Chinn shares the books on her shelf.

RMB_featured image

Bookshelf: Rebecca M. Brown

For the first in Art Journal Open’s new Bookshelf series, Rebecca M. Brown shares what’s on her reading list.

RMB_featured image

Bookshelf: Rebecca M. Brown

For the first in Art Journal Open’s new Bookshelf series, Rebecca M. Brown shares what’s on her reading list.

Rudy Lemcke, Foscarnet, 1989, graphite on Fabriano Roma paper, 26.5 x 19.5 in. (67.31 x 49.53 cm.) (artwork © Rudy Lemcke)

Immemorial: The Poetics of AIDS; A Conversation with Rudy Lemcke

By Tina Takemoto
Tina Takemoto and artist Rudy Lemcke discuss his artistic practice and the poetics and politics of AIDS.

Rudy Lemcke, Foscarnet, 1989, graphite on Fabriano Roma paper, 26.5 x 19.5 in. (67.31 x 49.53 cm.) (artwork © Rudy Lemcke)

Immemorial: The Poetics of AIDS; A Conversation with Rudy Lemcke

By Tina Takemoto
Tina Takemoto and artist Rudy Lemcke discuss his artistic practice and the poetics and politics of AIDS.

Kate Gilmore, gallery installation view of Like This, Before, 2013, video, wood, glass, paint (artwork © Kate Gilmore;  image courtesy of Clements Photography and Design)

Broken Dishes: Kate Gilmore in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
For the second installment of her conversation series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with artist Kate Gilmore about Gilmore’s process of creating Like This, Before (2013), and the importance of breaking things and laughing about it.

Kate Gilmore, gallery installation view of Like This, Before, 2013, video, wood, glass, paint (artwork © Kate Gilmore;  image courtesy of Clements Photography and Design)

Broken Dishes: Kate Gilmore in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
For the second installment of her conversation series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with artist Kate Gilmore about Gilmore’s process of creating Like This, Before (2013), and the importance of breaking things and laughing about it.

Posed photograph of members of Homeward Bound Community Services at Homeless: The Street and Other Venues, 1989 (photographer unknown; photograph provided by Martha Rosler)

In, Around, and Afterthoughts (On Participation): Photography and Agency in Martha Rosler’s Collaboration with Homeward Bound

By Adair Rounthwaite

It seems obvious to state that photographs play a central role in our ability to study participatory art. Art historians, however, have largely bracketed this as an issue that might be important for how we conceive the politics and aesthetics of participation.

Posed photograph of members of Homeward Bound Community Services at Homeless: The Street and Other Venues, 1989 (photographer unknown; photograph provided by Martha Rosler)

In, Around, and Afterthoughts (On Participation): Photography and Agency in Martha Rosler’s Collaboration with Homeward Bound

By Adair Rounthwaite

It seems obvious to state that photographs play a central role in our ability to study participatory art. Art historians, however, have largely bracketed this as an issue that might be important for how we conceive the politics and aesthetics of participation.

Claire F. Fox, Making Art Panamerican: Cultural Policy and the Cold War

Transnational Fields and the Blindness of the Archive

By Dorota Biczel

Dorota Biczel reviews Making Art Panamerican: Cultural Policy and the Cold War by Claire F. Fox.

Claire F. Fox, Making Art Panamerican: Cultural Policy and the Cold War

Transnational Fields and the Blindness of the Archive

By Dorota Biczel

Dorota Biczel reviews Making Art Panamerican: Cultural Policy and the Cold War by Claire F. Fox.

Reviews 4

Primal Matter: An Annotated Bibliography for Ceramics

By Brian Molanphy

This introductory selection of texts on ceramics includes books that offer general foundations as well as essays that exemplify specific investigations.

Reviews 4

Primal Matter: An Annotated Bibliography for Ceramics

By Brian Molanphy

This introductory selection of texts on ceramics includes books that offer general foundations as well as essays that exemplify specific investigations.

William Lamson, Untitled (Walden), 2014, exterior view of Lamson’s floating camera obscura, color photograph (artwork © William Lamson)

Floating Cabins and Shifting Landscapes: William Lamson in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
In this interview, curator Dina Deitsch and artist William Lamson discuss the slippery space of video, working with and in nature, and the poetics of floating cabins.

William Lamson, Untitled (Walden), 2014, exterior view of Lamson’s floating camera obscura, color photograph (artwork © William Lamson)

Floating Cabins and Shifting Landscapes: William Lamson in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
In this interview, curator Dina Deitsch and artist William Lamson discuss the slippery space of video, working with and in nature, and the poetics of floating cabins.

Jeremy Wood,  Data Cloud, 2008, . GPS sculpture (artwork © Jeremy Wood)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #3

by Mike Maizels

As the first pair of artists in this series examined the semantics of local places, and the second explored the possibility of picturing the world in totality, both artists in the final pairing investigate the question of geographic epistemology—how do the materials facts of the external world become the objects of systematic human understanding?

Jeremy Wood,  Data Cloud, 2008, . GPS sculpture (artwork © Jeremy Wood)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #3

by Mike Maizels

As the first pair of artists in this series examined the semantics of local places, and the second explored the possibility of picturing the world in totality, both artists in the final pairing investigate the question of geographic epistemology—how do the materials facts of the external world become the objects of systematic human understanding?

Huey Copeland, Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America

Objects Made Black

by Sampada Aranke

Sampada Aranke reviews Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America by Huey Copeland.

Huey Copeland, Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America

Objects Made Black

by Sampada Aranke

Sampada Aranke reviews Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America by Huey Copeland.

Roberto Jacoby, 1968: El culo te abrocho (1968: I Do Your Ass), 2008, two of a series of 28 inkjet and silkscreen prints on cotton linters papers, 35½ x 27½ in. (90 x 70 cm) (artwork © Roberto Jacoby; photograph provided by the artist)

Dead Boars, Viruses, and Zombies: Roberto Jacoby’s Art History

By Daniel R. Quiles
The subtlest of deceptions lies in wait in a “1000 Words” feature on Roberto Jacoby in the March 2011 issue of Artforum.

Roberto Jacoby, 1968: El culo te abrocho (1968: I Do Your Ass), 2008, two of a series of 28 inkjet and silkscreen prints on cotton linters papers, 35½ x 27½ in. (90 x 70 cm) (artwork © Roberto Jacoby; photograph provided by the artist)

Dead Boars, Viruses, and Zombies: Roberto Jacoby’s Art History

By Daniel R. Quiles
The subtlest of deceptions lies in wait in a “1000 Words” feature on Roberto Jacoby in the March 2011 issue of Artforum.

Shawn Brixey, Epicycle (2000). (© Shawn Brixey)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #2

By Mike Maizels
Mike Maizels examines Shawn Brixey’s Epicycle (2000) and Robert Smithson’s Pointless Vanishing Point (1967) in the second installment of The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0.

Shawn Brixey, Epicycle (2000). (© Shawn Brixey)

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #2

By Mike Maizels
Mike Maizels examines Shawn Brixey’s Epicycle (2000) and Robert Smithson’s Pointless Vanishing Point (1967) in the second installment of The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0.

Karen L. Schiff, Agnes Martin, El País, 21 December 2004, II, 2005, graphite and stylus on vellum, 17 x 12 inches (artwork © Karen L. Schiff)

Imprinting Agnes Martin

By Karen L. Schiff

In the early 1990s I saw a conference presentation about Agnes Martin’s grid paintings, and their rigor and sensitivity was imprinted on me: I felt motivated to return to making art. When Martin (1912–2004) passed away, I started making artworks to reflect on her work and life, often through printed texts.

Karen L. Schiff, Agnes Martin, El País, 21 December 2004, II, 2005, graphite and stylus on vellum, 17 x 12 inches (artwork © Karen L. Schiff)

Imprinting Agnes Martin

By Karen L. Schiff

In the early 1990s I saw a conference presentation about Agnes Martin’s grid paintings, and their rigor and sensitivity was imprinted on me: I felt motivated to return to making art. When Martin (1912–2004) passed away, I started making artworks to reflect on her work and life, often through printed texts.