Exchange: Geeta Kapur, Saloni Mathur, and Rachel Weiss

Geeta Kapur puts forth a thirteen-part text, “Proposition Avant-Garde: A View from the South,” with critical responses by Saloni Mathur and Rachel Weiss.

Exchange: Geeta Kapur, Saloni Mathur, and Rachel Weiss

Geeta Kapur puts forth a thirteen-part text, “Proposition Avant-Garde: A View from the South,” with critical responses by Saloni Mathur and Rachel Weiss.

Citation Bombing: Tactical and Symbolic Subversion of Academic Metrification

Zach Kaiser presents his app CitationBomb, as well as his theory and practice of scrambling and hacking the contemporary metrics of academic success. In “overflowing the commodity market for citations,” Kaiser questions the value systems we assign to knowledge production and consumption.

Citation Bombing: Tactical and Symbolic Subversion of Academic Metrification

Zach Kaiser presents his app CitationBomb, as well as his theory and practice of scrambling and hacking the contemporary metrics of academic success. In “overflowing the commodity market for citations,” Kaiser questions the value systems we assign to knowledge production and consumption.

Decentering Land Art from the Borderlands: A Review of Through the Repellent Fence

The 2017 film Through the Repellent Fence looks at Postcommodity’s practice and its relation to and divergences from Land art traditions. Emily Eliza Scott explores the film and the role of art along the US-Mexico border.

Decentering Land Art from the Borderlands: A Review of Through the Repellent Fence

The 2017 film Through the Repellent Fence looks at Postcommodity’s practice and its relation to and divergences from Land art traditions. Emily Eliza Scott explores the film and the role of art along the US-Mexico border.

Health as a Means of Access

Sara Reisman reflects on the ways in which artists and institutions consider (or disregard) how individuals with disabilities access their work.

Health as a Means of Access

Sara Reisman reflects on the ways in which artists and institutions consider (or disregard) how individuals with disabilities access their work.

Afrotropes: A User’s Guide

Huey Copeland and Krista Thompson sketch the concept of the afrotrope, a term they have developed over the past decade to describe “those recurrent visual forms that have emerged within and become central to the formation of African diasporic culture and identity.”

Afrotropes: A User’s Guide

Huey Copeland and Krista Thompson sketch the concept of the afrotrope, a term they have developed over the past decade to describe “those recurrent visual forms that have emerged within and become central to the formation of African diasporic culture and identity.”

Exhibition Situations: Risham Majeed in Conversation with Elizabeth Rodini

By Risham Majeed and Elizabeth Rodini
Risham Majeed and Elizabeth Rodini discuss Majeed’s exhibition Made to Move: African Nomadic Design, the museological and curatorial challenges posed by the exhibition’s material, and the possibility of a decolonized museum space.

Exhibition Situations: Risham Majeed in Conversation with Elizabeth Rodini

By Risham Majeed and Elizabeth Rodini
Risham Majeed and Elizabeth Rodini discuss Majeed’s exhibition Made to Move: African Nomadic Design, the museological and curatorial challenges posed by the exhibition’s material, and the possibility of a decolonized museum space.

Naturalcultural Wonders to Anthropocene Disasters: A Bibliography for Possibility Aesthetics

Andrew Yang shares a “transdisciplinary cluster” of works that engage the concept of the Anthropocene. When it comes to climate change, Yang asks, “Which we is responsible, or most at risk? What sorts of people, organisms, and entities does we invite or exclude?”

Naturalcultural Wonders to Anthropocene Disasters: A Bibliography for Possibility Aesthetics

Andrew Yang shares a “transdisciplinary cluster” of works that engage the concept of the Anthropocene. When it comes to climate change, Yang asks, “Which we is responsible, or most at risk? What sorts of people, organisms, and entities does we invite or exclude?”

Scripting A Smeary Spot

By A.K. Burns and Melissa Ragain

In this annotated commentary, artist A.K. Burns and art historian and critic Melissa Ragain explore the script, performances, and citations in Burn’s video installation A Smeary Spot (2015), which is the first episode in her five-part Negative Space film cycle.

Scripting A Smeary Spot

By A.K. Burns and Melissa Ragain

In this annotated commentary, artist A.K. Burns and art historian and critic Melissa Ragain explore the script, performances, and citations in Burn’s video installation A Smeary Spot (2015), which is the first episode in her five-part Negative Space film cycle.

Medias Res

By Nick Herman

Art Journal Open presents Medias Res by artist Nick Herman, which features Herman’s exploration of his artworks and texts related to his interests in static, rastering, layering, and other transmission processes. These interests have led Herman to create two new works to be viewed on Art Journal Open: Comm 1 (2017), which takes the shape of a unique and experimental pop-up GIF experience, and MERROR ERROR TERRIOR (2017), a downloadable image. “Static or noise as a record of transmission becomes its own reward, reflecting its innate complexity and, in the process, some greater truth about its origin.” Herman writes, “To me, the GIF does something similar, capturing the unpredictable rhythms and constituent raster of their source.”

Medias Res

By Nick Herman

Art Journal Open presents Medias Res by artist Nick Herman, which features Herman’s exploration of his artworks and texts related to his interests in static, rastering, layering, and other transmission processes. These interests have led Herman to create two new works to be viewed on Art Journal Open: Comm 1 (2017), which takes the shape of a unique and experimental pop-up GIF experience, and MERROR ERROR TERRIOR (2017), a downloadable image. “Static or noise as a record of transmission becomes its own reward, reflecting its innate complexity and, in the process, some greater truth about its origin.” Herman writes, “To me, the GIF does something similar, capturing the unpredictable rhythms and constituent raster of their source.”

To Listen

By Anna Craycroft

In “To Listen,” artist Anna Craycroft considers the role of the voice of the artist and reflects on her process of creating her exhibition Tuning the Room (Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, January 28–April 16, 2017) in relationship to her research into the archives of photographer Berenice Abbott for Craycroft’s exhibition The Earth Is a Magnet (Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, November 16, 2016–March 26, 2017). This is the second installment of Craycroft’s two-part series for Art Journal Open.

To Listen

By Anna Craycroft

In “To Listen,” artist Anna Craycroft considers the role of the voice of the artist and reflects on her process of creating her exhibition Tuning the Room (Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, January 28–April 16, 2017) in relationship to her research into the archives of photographer Berenice Abbott for Craycroft’s exhibition The Earth Is a Magnet (Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, November 16, 2016–March 26, 2017). This is the second installment of Craycroft’s two-part series for Art Journal Open.

Community and Creativity at Residencies Near and Far: Chad Stayrook in Conversation with Caitlin Masley-Charlet

By Caitlin Masley-Charlet

Caitlin Masley-Charlet speaks with artist Chad Stayrook about his experiences at artist residencies around the world, the effects that residencies have had his artistic practice, and the development of Present Company, the artist-run space in Brooklyn that he cofounded.

Community and Creativity at Residencies Near and Far: Chad Stayrook in Conversation with Caitlin Masley-Charlet

By Caitlin Masley-Charlet

Caitlin Masley-Charlet speaks with artist Chad Stayrook about his experiences at artist residencies around the world, the effects that residencies have had his artistic practice, and the development of Present Company, the artist-run space in Brooklyn that he cofounded.

In Conversation with Marie Watt: A New Coyote Tale

By Marie Watt

Marie Watt first encountered Joseph Beuys’s work as a college student studying abroad. While working on an MFA at Yale, she wrote a reflection on the artist’s I Like America and America Likes Me from the perspective of Coyote, for a course taught by the art historian Romy Golan.

In Conversation with Marie Watt: A New Coyote Tale

By Marie Watt

Marie Watt first encountered Joseph Beuys’s work as a college student studying abroad. While working on an MFA at Yale, she wrote a reflection on the artist’s I Like America and America Likes Me from the perspective of Coyote, for a course taught by the art historian Romy Golan.

How to Organize Delirium?

By Camila Maroja

Camila Maroja reviews the exhibition and catalogue, Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium.

How to Organize Delirium?

By Camila Maroja

Camila Maroja reviews the exhibition and catalogue, Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium.

2017: Indigenous Futures

By Kate Morris and Bill Anthes

On November 15, 2016, a “National Day of Action,” demonstrators in cities from Los Angeles to New York took to the streets in support of the efforts of the Standing Rock Sioux to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline (DAPL). According to tribal leaders, the presence of the pipeline constitutes a dire threat to the tribe’s water supply, and will desecrate scores of sacred, historical, and cultural sites along its intended 1,172-mile route.

2017: Indigenous Futures

By Kate Morris and Bill Anthes

On November 15, 2016, a “National Day of Action,” demonstrators in cities from Los Angeles to New York took to the streets in support of the efforts of the Standing Rock Sioux to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline (DAPL). According to tribal leaders, the presence of the pipeline constitutes a dire threat to the tribe’s water supply, and will desecrate scores of sacred, historical, and cultural sites along its intended 1,172-mile route.

Building a Table

By Ryan Kuo

In “Building a Table,” artist and writer Ryan Kuo discusses his use of HTML to construct the data tables in his artist’s project, Tables of Content, and the profound implications that seemingly benign systems of ordering have on society. With an introduction by Art Journal Open’s former web editor, Gloria Sutton.

Building a Table

By Ryan Kuo

In “Building a Table,” artist and writer Ryan Kuo discusses his use of HTML to construct the data tables in his artist’s project, Tables of Content, and the profound implications that seemingly benign systems of ordering have on society. With an introduction by Art Journal Open’s former web editor, Gloria Sutton.

Tables of Content

By Ryan Kuo

Art Journal Open presents an interactive artist’s project by Ryan Kuo.

Tables of Content

By Ryan Kuo

Art Journal Open presents an interactive artist’s project by Ryan Kuo.

Warm, Wet, Cold, Dry: Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979

By Charissa Terranova

Charissa Terranova discusses the exhibition and catalogue, Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979, which was on view at the Tate Britain from April 12–August 29, 2016.

Warm, Wet, Cold, Dry: Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979

By Charissa Terranova

Charissa Terranova discusses the exhibition and catalogue, Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979, which was on view at the Tate Britain from April 12–August 29, 2016.

Damon Davis’s Negrophilia: Encounters with Black Death

By Olubukola A. Gbadegesin

Olubukola A. Gbadegesin speaks with multidisciplinary artist Damon Davis about his mixed-media collage series, Negrophilia, and the importance of self-representation. “We’ve got to represent ourselves,” Davis says, “Because if we let others tell the story, important parts are going to be erased.

Damon Davis’s Negrophilia: Encounters with Black Death

By Olubukola A. Gbadegesin

Olubukola A. Gbadegesin speaks with multidisciplinary artist Damon Davis about his mixed-media collage series, Negrophilia, and the importance of self-representation. “We’ve got to represent ourselves,” Davis says, “Because if we let others tell the story, important parts are going to be erased.

Restructuring Place in Hawaiʻi: Jaimey Hamilton Faris and Margo Machida in Conversation with Sean Connelly and Lynne Yamamoto

By Jaimey Hamilton Faris and Margo Machida

Jaimey Hamilton Faris and Margo Machida speak with Hawaiʻi-born artists Lynne Yamamoto and Sean Connelly to discuss their sculptural works for the inaugural Honolulu Biennial, Middle of Now|Here (March 8–May 8, 2017). Connelly’s Thatch Assembly with Rocks (2060s) (2017) and Yamamoto’s Borrowed Time (2017) recognize the significance of locality and place in illuminating the enduring impact of entwined histories and shifting alignments among the native, local, and global.

Restructuring Place in Hawaiʻi: Jaimey Hamilton Faris and Margo Machida in Conversation with Sean Connelly and Lynne Yamamoto

By Jaimey Hamilton Faris and Margo Machida

Jaimey Hamilton Faris and Margo Machida speak with Hawaiʻi-born artists Lynne Yamamoto and Sean Connelly to discuss their sculptural works for the inaugural Honolulu Biennial, Middle of Now|Here (March 8–May 8, 2017). Connelly’s Thatch Assembly with Rocks (2060s) (2017) and Yamamoto’s Borrowed Time (2017) recognize the significance of locality and place in illuminating the enduring impact of entwined histories and shifting alignments among the native, local, and global.

Bookshelf: Ace Lehner

By Ace Lehner
Ace Lehner shares their reading list with Art Journal Open.

Bookshelf: Ace Lehner

By Ace Lehner
Ace Lehner shares their reading list with Art Journal Open.

The Prehistory of Exhibition History

By grupa o.k. (Julian Myers and Joanna Szupinska)

Art history has long included studies of exhibitions as episodes or turning points within more expansive narratives. Such moments have opened art histories based in the studio, or among the members of a small, bohemian circle, to a larger social field that includes politics, audience, and market, before returning to the private or small-group interactions that have equally served to drive art’s internal means.

The Prehistory of Exhibition History

By grupa o.k. (Julian Myers and Joanna Szupinska)

Art history has long included studies of exhibitions as episodes or turning points within more expansive narratives. Such moments have opened art histories based in the studio, or among the members of a small, bohemian circle, to a larger social field that includes politics, audience, and market, before returning to the private or small-group interactions that have equally served to drive art’s internal means.

Introduction: The Politics of Legacy

By Rachel Middleman and Anne Monahan

In 1974 news that David Smith’s executors had stripped paint from some of his sculptures catalyzed a long-running public conversation about executors’ responsibilities to artists, artworks, and art history. Forty years later, news that the same estate’s administrators tried to stifle the exhibition and sale of Lauren Clay’s diminutive, painted-paper objects inspired by that earlier incident has yet to prompt a similar critical response.

Introduction: The Politics of Legacy

By Rachel Middleman and Anne Monahan

In 1974 news that David Smith’s executors had stripped paint from some of his sculptures catalyzed a long-running public conversation about executors’ responsibilities to artists, artworks, and art history. Forty years later, news that the same estate’s administrators tried to stifle the exhibition and sale of Lauren Clay’s diminutive, painted-paper objects inspired by that earlier incident has yet to prompt a similar critical response.

Art Embedded into Protest: Staging the Ukrainian Maidan

By Nazar Kozak

Around 9:00am on January 24, 2014, Maxym Vehera, an amateur artist, comes to Hrushevskyi Street in Kyiv, mounts his portable easel some one hundred yards from the riot police line, and spends five hours painting the scene of a street fight in progress. Black smoke from the burning barricade veils the sky, tear gas irritates the frosty air, a stun grenade explosion shuts all senses down. The canvas falls to the ground, into the mixture of snow and ashes. Vehera picks it up, wipes off the dirt, and continues to paint amid chaos.

Art Embedded into Protest: Staging the Ukrainian Maidan

By Nazar Kozak

Around 9:00am on January 24, 2014, Maxym Vehera, an amateur artist, comes to Hrushevskyi Street in Kyiv, mounts his portable easel some one hundred yards from the riot police line, and spends five hours painting the scene of a street fight in progress. Black smoke from the burning barricade veils the sky, tear gas irritates the frosty air, a stun grenade explosion shuts all senses down. The canvas falls to the ground, into the mixture of snow and ashes. Vehera picks it up, wipes off the dirt, and continues to paint amid chaos.

In Submission

By Ryan Kuo
“As platforms from Submittable to Snapchat streamline personal publishing into drag-and-drop gestures,” writes Ryan Kuo, “the work being submitted becomes not the work, but a signpost redirecting us to a semblance of the work, subject to Terms and Conditions.” “In Submission” is the first of a three-part series by writer and artist Ryan Kuo for Art Journal Open.

In Submission

By Ryan Kuo
“As platforms from Submittable to Snapchat streamline personal publishing into drag-and-drop gestures,” writes Ryan Kuo, “the work being submitted becomes not the work, but a signpost redirecting us to a semblance of the work, subject to Terms and Conditions.” “In Submission” is the first of a three-part series by writer and artist Ryan Kuo for Art Journal Open.

Communing with Dore Ashton

By Michael Corris

A tribute to Dore Ashton, “one of the most energetic, widely published, and politicized American writers on art, and one of the chief proponents of the artists of the New York School (she decried the label Abstract Expressionism).” Michael Corris shares his remembrances of Dore Ashton as well as the audio and transcribed text from their 2011 conversation about Ashton’s experiences with the New York art world in the 19650s and 1960s. Alfredo Jaar’s film, Dore Ashton, you know (2015), and photographs by Madeline Djerejian and Polly Bradford-Corris are also presented here.

Communing with Dore Ashton

By Michael Corris

A tribute to Dore Ashton, “one of the most energetic, widely published, and politicized American writers on art, and one of the chief proponents of the artists of the New York School (she decried the label Abstract Expressionism).” Michael Corris shares his remembrances of Dore Ashton as well as the audio and transcribed text from their 2011 conversation about Ashton’s experiences with the New York art world in the 19650s and 1960s. Alfredo Jaar’s film, Dore Ashton, you know (2015), and photographs by Madeline Djerejian and Polly Bradford-Corris are also presented here.

Temporary Collectives

An update from Temporary Collectives, a dynamic intercollegiate graduate project involving professors and students from six universities in North Texas.

Temporary Collectives

An update from Temporary Collectives, a dynamic intercollegiate graduate project involving professors and students from six universities in North Texas.

Playing by the Rules: Ericka Beckman in Conversation with Mary L. Coyne

By Mary L. Coyne
For the first conversation in Mary L. Coyne’s Playing by the Rules series, Coyne speaks with filmmaker Ericka Beckman about the framework of games and performance in Beckman’s films You The Better and Cinderella.

Playing by the Rules: Ericka Beckman in Conversation with Mary L. Coyne

By Mary L. Coyne
For the first conversation in Mary L. Coyne’s Playing by the Rules series, Coyne speaks with filmmaker Ericka Beckman about the framework of games and performance in Beckman’s films You The Better and Cinderella.

Playing by the Rules (Parts I–III)

By Mary L. Coyne
An introduction to Playing by the Rules, a new conversation series by curator and writer Mary L. Coyne.

Playing by the Rules (Parts I–III)

By Mary L. Coyne
An introduction to Playing by the Rules, a new conversation series by curator and writer Mary L. Coyne.

Update from Voices in Contemporary Art

An update from Voices in Contemporary Art (VoCA) on the most recent issue of VoCA Journal.

Update from Voices in Contemporary Art

An update from Voices in Contemporary Art (VoCA) on the most recent issue of VoCA Journal.

Bookshelf: Alexandra Nitschke

By Alexandra Nitschke

Alexandra Nitschke shares what she’s reading with Art Journal Open.

Bookshelf: Alexandra Nitschke

By Alexandra Nitschke

Alexandra Nitschke shares what she’s reading with Art Journal Open.

To Record, to Interpret, to Comment

By Anna Craycroft

In “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment,” Brookyn–based artist Anna Craycroft asks readers to reconsider how we come to know what we think we know about the history of modernist photography and the photographer Berenice Abbott, which draws from Craycroft’s extensive research into Abbott’s writings, photographs, letters, inventions, and other archival materials.

To Record, to Interpret, to Comment

By Anna Craycroft

In “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment,” Brookyn–based artist Anna Craycroft asks readers to reconsider how we come to know what we think we know about the history of modernist photography and the photographer Berenice Abbott, which draws from Craycroft’s extensive research into Abbott’s writings, photographs, letters, inventions, and other archival materials.

Art Journal Open Presents “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment” by Anna Craycroft

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open presents “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment” by Anna Craycroft.

Art Journal Open Presents “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment” by Anna Craycroft

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open presents “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment” by Anna Craycroft.

Edges of Action

By Nick Herman

In Edges of Action (2016), Los Angeles–based artist Nick Herman finds a distinctive method of framing his practice, blending the studied delivery of a public artist’s talk with the conversational pace of an intimate studio visit. This is the first installment of a unique three-part artist’s project Herman has created for Art Journal Open.

Edges of Action

By Nick Herman

In Edges of Action (2016), Los Angeles–based artist Nick Herman finds a distinctive method of framing his practice, blending the studied delivery of a public artist’s talk with the conversational pace of an intimate studio visit. This is the first installment of a unique three-part artist’s project Herman has created for Art Journal Open.

Art Journal Open Presents Edges of Action by Nick Herman

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present Edges of Action by artist Nick Herman.

Art Journal Open Presents Edges of Action by Nick Herman

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present Edges of Action by artist Nick Herman.

Bookshelf: Lynn M. Somers

By Lynn M. Somers

Lynn M. Somers shares her reading list in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf.

Bookshelf: Lynn M. Somers

By Lynn M. Somers

Lynn M. Somers shares her reading list in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf.

Candida Höfer’s Türken in Deutschland as “Counter-publicity”

By Amy A. DaPonte

Millions of Turkish immigrants settled in Germany after World War II to answer the call of politicians who needed to refresh the labor force after the war. Images of Turks at work or leisure in the parks, homes, markets, shops, and bars of 1970s West German cities populate Candida Höfer’s large, multiformat series entitled Türken in Deutschland (Turks in Germany, 1972–79).

Candida Höfer’s Türken in Deutschland as “Counter-publicity”

By Amy A. DaPonte

Millions of Turkish immigrants settled in Germany after World War II to answer the call of politicians who needed to refresh the labor force after the war. Images of Turks at work or leisure in the parks, homes, markets, shops, and bars of 1970s West German cities populate Candida Höfer’s large, multiformat series entitled Türken in Deutschland (Turks in Germany, 1972–79).

Lee Miller, Challenging Convention

By Lauren Richman

Lauren Richman reviews Hilary Roberts, ed., Lee Miller: A Woman’s War, and the exhibition Lee Miller: A Woman’s War, and Walter Moser and Klaus Albrecht Schröder, eds., Lee Miller, and the exhibition Lee Miller, aka Lee Miller—Photographs and The Indestructible Lee Miller

Lee Miller, Challenging Convention

By Lauren Richman

Lauren Richman reviews Hilary Roberts, ed., Lee Miller: A Woman’s War, and the exhibition Lee Miller: A Woman’s War, and Walter Moser and Klaus Albrecht Schröder, eds., Lee Miller, and the exhibition Lee Miller, aka Lee Miller—Photographs and The Indestructible Lee Miller

Bookshelf: Elise Dodeles

By Elise Dodeles
In this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf, Elise Dodeles shares what she’s reading.

Bookshelf: Elise Dodeles

By Elise Dodeles
In this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf, Elise Dodeles shares what she’s reading.

Art Practice beyond the Home Studio: Roberto Visani and Caitlin Masley-Charlet in Conversation

By Caitlin Masley-Charlet

Caitlin Masley-Charlet, deputy director of Guttenberg Arts in Guttenberg, New Jersey, and artist Roberto Visani discuss his experiences while artist-in-residence at Guttenberg Arts and other residencies.

Art Practice beyond the Home Studio: Roberto Visani and Caitlin Masley-Charlet in Conversation

By Caitlin Masley-Charlet

Caitlin Masley-Charlet, deputy director of Guttenberg Arts in Guttenberg, New Jersey, and artist Roberto Visani discuss his experiences while artist-in-residence at Guttenberg Arts and other residencies.

Bookshelf: Lisa Pon

By Lisa Pon

Lisa Pon shares her reading list in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf.

Bookshelf: Lisa Pon

By Lisa Pon

Lisa Pon shares her reading list in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf.

P&P

By Kate Costello

The Los Angeles–based artist Kate Costello has created a unique animation of her limited edition book, P&P. P&P conveys Costello’s examination and subjective cataloging of vernacular languages active within contemporary visual culture.

P&P

By Kate Costello

The Los Angeles–based artist Kate Costello has created a unique animation of her limited edition book, P&P. P&P conveys Costello’s examination and subjective cataloging of vernacular languages active within contemporary visual culture.

Art Journal Open Presents P&P by Kate Costello

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present a new Contemporary Project by artist Kate Costello.

Art Journal Open Presents P&P by Kate Costello

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present a new Contemporary Project by artist Kate Costello.

Solitary/Solidary: Mario Merz’s Autonomous Artist

By Elizabeth Mangini

In 1968, while demonstrating students occupied university buildings less than a mile away, the Italian artist Mario Merz hung a handful of neon lights bent into the numerals 1, 1, 2, 3, and 5 above the kitchen stove in his home on Via Santa Giulia in Turin. It wasn’t yet an artwork, just something to think about in the place where he and his wife, fellow artist Marisa Merz, gathered to talk with each other and with friends.

Solitary/Solidary: Mario Merz’s Autonomous Artist

By Elizabeth Mangini

In 1968, while demonstrating students occupied university buildings less than a mile away, the Italian artist Mario Merz hung a handful of neon lights bent into the numerals 1, 1, 2, 3, and 5 above the kitchen stove in his home on Via Santa Giulia in Turin. It wasn’t yet an artwork, just something to think about in the place where he and his wife, fellow artist Marisa Merz, gathered to talk with each other and with friends.

Art-Science: An Annotated Bibliography

By Roger F. Malina

We are witnessing a resurgence of creative and scholarly work that seeks to bridge science and engineering with the arts, design, and the humanities. These practices connect both the arts and sciences, hence the term art-science, and the arts and the engineering sciences and technology, hence the term “art and technology.”

Art-Science: An Annotated Bibliography

By Roger F. Malina

We are witnessing a resurgence of creative and scholarly work that seeks to bridge science and engineering with the arts, design, and the humanities. These practices connect both the arts and sciences, hence the term art-science, and the arts and the engineering sciences and technology, hence the term “art and technology.”

no water, Athens, Greece, 2015: Twenty-four hours with nothing to eat or drink, only smelling the jasmine

By Penelope Vlassopoulou

Penelope Vlassopoulou began her Metamorphosis series in her home city of Athens. The series evolved in multidisciplinary dialogue with diverse urban environments including Berlin, Belgrade, and Chicago. In March 2015, Metamorphosis returned to its point of origin with no water tracing a link between Greece’s historical past and the country’s current predicament.

no water, Athens, Greece, 2015: Twenty-four hours with nothing to eat or drink, only smelling the jasmine

By Penelope Vlassopoulou

Penelope Vlassopoulou began her Metamorphosis series in her home city of Athens. The series evolved in multidisciplinary dialogue with diverse urban environments including Berlin, Belgrade, and Chicago. In March 2015, Metamorphosis returned to its point of origin with no water tracing a link between Greece’s historical past and the country’s current predicament.

Happyville in the Rearview: A Conversation between Joel Tauber and Pedro de Llano

By Pedro de Llano

Curator and art historian Pedro de Llano speaks with artist Joel Tauber about Tauber’s The Sharing Project (2012–16), an installation and film project that looks at the socialist Jewish community of Happyville (1905–1908) in South Carolina as a way to consider complex questions about social, political, and economic issues in today’s world.

Happyville in the Rearview: A Conversation between Joel Tauber and Pedro de Llano

By Pedro de Llano

Curator and art historian Pedro de Llano speaks with artist Joel Tauber about Tauber’s The Sharing Project (2012–16), an installation and film project that looks at the socialist Jewish community of Happyville (1905–1908) in South Carolina as a way to consider complex questions about social, political, and economic issues in today’s world.

A New Configuration: Marco Breuer in Conversation with Vanessa Kauffman

By Vanessa Kauffman

Artist Marco Breuer and Vanessa Kauffman, communications and outreach manager of Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausalito, California), discuss Breuer’s experiences as an artist-in-residence at Headlands and other residencies, and the way that the flexibility and differences in the studio set-up at each residency creates opportunities for new discoveries.

A New Configuration: Marco Breuer in Conversation with Vanessa Kauffman

By Vanessa Kauffman

Artist Marco Breuer and Vanessa Kauffman, communications and outreach manager of Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausalito, California), discuss Breuer’s experiences as an artist-in-residence at Headlands and other residencies, and the way that the flexibility and differences in the studio set-up at each residency creates opportunities for new discoveries.

Root and Ramble: Kija Lucas and Amy Cancelmo in Conversation

By Amy Cancelmo

Amy Cancelmo, art programs director at Root Division (San Francisco, California), speaks with artist Kija Lucas about her experiences as an artist-in-residence at Root Division and other residencies, and her cross-country travels to work on her projects In Search of Home and Objects to Remember You By: An Index of Sentiment .

Root and Ramble: Kija Lucas and Amy Cancelmo in Conversation

By Amy Cancelmo

Amy Cancelmo, art programs director at Root Division (San Francisco, California), speaks with artist Kija Lucas about her experiences as an artist-in-residence at Root Division and other residencies, and her cross-country travels to work on her projects In Search of Home and Objects to Remember You By: An Index of Sentiment .

Between Negative Dialectics and Biological Aesthesis

By Charissa Terranova

Charissa Terranova reviews Wetware: Art, Agency, Animation, which was on view at the Beall Center for Art + Technology, University of California, Irvine, from February 6–May 7, 2016.

Between Negative Dialectics and Biological Aesthesis

By Charissa Terranova

Charissa Terranova reviews Wetware: Art, Agency, Animation, which was on view at the Beall Center for Art + Technology, University of California, Irvine, from February 6–May 7, 2016.

Outside of Time: Patricia Fernández Carcedo in Conversation with Vanessa Kauffman

By Vanessa Kauffman

Vanessa Kauffman, communications and outreach manager for Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausalito, California), speaks with artist Patricia Fernández Carcedo about her experiences as an artist-in-residence at Headlands and other residencies, and the importance that walking holds within her artistic practice.

Outside of Time: Patricia Fernández Carcedo in Conversation with Vanessa Kauffman

By Vanessa Kauffman

Vanessa Kauffman, communications and outreach manager for Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausalito, California), speaks with artist Patricia Fernández Carcedo about her experiences as an artist-in-residence at Headlands and other residencies, and the importance that walking holds within her artistic practice.

Web Editor’s Note: Conversations

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to introduce a new cluster of conversations focused on artist residencies.

Web Editor’s Note: Conversations

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to introduce a new cluster of conversations focused on artist residencies.

Humans Have Been Human for So Long: Shana Lutker and Mika Yoshitake in Conversation

By Mika Yoshitake

Curator Mika Yoshitake and artist Shana Lutker discuss Surrealist fightfights, making sense of the past through the lens of the contemporary, and the research process for Lutker’s exhibition Shana Lutker: Le “NEW” Monocle, Chapters 1–3 at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC (October 27, 2015–February 16, 2016), which was curated by Yoshitake.

Humans Have Been Human for So Long: Shana Lutker and Mika Yoshitake in Conversation

By Mika Yoshitake

Curator Mika Yoshitake and artist Shana Lutker discuss Surrealist fightfights, making sense of the past through the lens of the contemporary, and the research process for Lutker’s exhibition Shana Lutker: Le “NEW” Monocle, Chapters 1–3 at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC (October 27, 2015–February 16, 2016), which was curated by Yoshitake.

Space Travel: Trisha Brown’s Locus

By Amanda Jane Graham

In 1974 the choreographer Trisha Brown moved to 541 Broadway in SoHo, New York City. The cast-iron “nexus” for postmodern dance, commonly referred to as “the dance building,” had what the former Brown company dancer Elizabeth Garren describes as a “communal atmosphere.” Purchased and renovated by the Fluxus founder George Maciunas “with dancers in mind,” 541 was wider than the majority of the standard buildings in the neighborhood, and more important, it contained no interior pillars, making it an ideal choreographic work space.

Space Travel: Trisha Brown’s Locus

By Amanda Jane Graham

In 1974 the choreographer Trisha Brown moved to 541 Broadway in SoHo, New York City. The cast-iron “nexus” for postmodern dance, commonly referred to as “the dance building,” had what the former Brown company dancer Elizabeth Garren describes as a “communal atmosphere.” Purchased and renovated by the Fluxus founder George Maciunas “with dancers in mind,” 541 was wider than the majority of the standard buildings in the neighborhood, and more important, it contained no interior pillars, making it an ideal choreographic work space.

Troubling Troublemakers

By Chris Taylor
Chris Taylor reviews Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art (2015), written and directed by James Crump.

Troubling Troublemakers

By Chris Taylor
Chris Taylor reviews Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art (2015), written and directed by James Crump.

Caitlin Masley-Charlet and Diana Shpungin in Conversation

By Caitlin Masley-Charlet
Caitlin Masley-Charlet, deputy director of Guttenberg Arts (Guttenberg, NJ), speaks with artist Diana Shpungin about her experiences as an artist-in-residence at Guttenberg Arts and other programs, artistic community, and the importance of having space for experimentation. This is the first conversation in a four-part series by Caitlin Masley-Charlet, focusing on artists who were recently in residence at Guttenberg Arts.

Caitlin Masley-Charlet and Diana Shpungin in Conversation

By Caitlin Masley-Charlet
Caitlin Masley-Charlet, deputy director of Guttenberg Arts (Guttenberg, NJ), speaks with artist Diana Shpungin about her experiences as an artist-in-residence at Guttenberg Arts and other programs, artistic community, and the importance of having space for experimentation. This is the first conversation in a four-part series by Caitlin Masley-Charlet, focusing on artists who were recently in residence at Guttenberg Arts.

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Three, 2013,” Natilee Harren looks at artist Karl Haendel’s practice of appropriation within the context of today’s image culture. This is the third and final part of her essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Three, 2013,” Natilee Harren looks at artist Karl Haendel’s practice of appropriation within the context of today’s image culture. This is the third and final part of her essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Three, 2013,” the third and final part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Three, 2013”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Three, 2013,” the third and final part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Small Boats, Slave Ship; or, Isaac Julien and the Beauty of Implied Catastrophe

By Emma Chubb

Three horizontal screens stretch across two gallery walls, suspended from the ceiling and hung in a slight arc. At first, the two flanking screens remain dark and only the center screen is illuminated. It shows an expanse of blue water, waves rippling with gold and reflecting the setting sun as they gently curl forward onto a barely visible beach.

Small Boats, Slave Ship; or, Isaac Julien and the Beauty of Implied Catastrophe

By Emma Chubb

Three horizontal screens stretch across two gallery walls, suspended from the ceiling and hung in a slight arc. At first, the two flanking screens remain dark and only the center screen is illuminated. It shows an expanse of blue water, waves rippling with gold and reflecting the setting sun as they gently curl forward onto a barely visible beach.

The Arctic Plants of New York City: An Annotated Bibliography

By James Walsh

I’ve been working since 2008 on a long, complex project centered on plants that grow in both the arctic (I always use the lowercase) and New York City, of which there are a surprising number. Along with identifying and pressing these plants, I’ve been reading eighteenth-century herbals and floras and more recent works on edible plants and botany generally, and have had a particular interest in mental travel and in writers who combine botany and literature.

The Arctic Plants of New York City: An Annotated Bibliography

By James Walsh

I’ve been working since 2008 on a long, complex project centered on plants that grow in both the arctic (I always use the lowercase) and New York City, of which there are a surprising number. Along with identifying and pressing these plants, I’ve been reading eighteenth-century herbals and floras and more recent works on edible plants and botany generally, and have had a particular interest in mental travel and in writers who combine botany and literature.

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Two” of her three-part essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation,” Natilee Harren explores appropriation, artistic heritage, and medieval suits of armor through the context of an encounter between Karl Haendel and an artist of an earlier generation, Robert Longo.

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012

By Natilee Harren
In “Episode Two” of her three-part essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation,” Natilee Harren explores appropriation, artistic heritage, and medieval suits of armor through the context of an encounter between Karl Haendel and an artist of an earlier generation, Robert Longo.

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Two, 2012,” the second part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012”

By Nate Harrison
Nate Harrison responds to “Episode Two, 2012,” the second part of Natilee Harren’s essay, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation.”

Wikipedia Needs You, But Do You Need Wikipedia?

By Chelsea Spengemann

Chelsea Spengemann on the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon held at the Museum of Modern Art on March 5, 2016.

Wikipedia Needs You, But Do You Need Wikipedia?

By Chelsea Spengemann

Chelsea Spengemann on the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon held at the Museum of Modern Art on March 5, 2016.

Bookshelf: Jongwoo Jeremy Kim

For this new installment of Art Journal Open Bookshelf, Jongwoo Jeremy Kim shares his reading list.

Bookshelf: Jongwoo Jeremy Kim

For this new installment of Art Journal Open Bookshelf, Jongwoo Jeremy Kim shares his reading list.

Leaving Düsseldorf

By Godfre Leung

Godfre Leung reviews Sabine Breitwieser, Laura J. Hoptman, Michael Darling, and Jeffrey D. Grove, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, and the exhibition Isa Genzken: Retrospective; Kathy Halbreich, ed., Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010, and the exhibition Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010; and Elodie Evers, Magdalena Holzhey, and Gregor Jansen, eds., Leben mit Pop and the exhibition Leben mit Pop.

Leaving Düsseldorf

By Godfre Leung

Godfre Leung reviews Sabine Breitwieser, Laura J. Hoptman, Michael Darling, and Jeffrey D. Grove, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, and the exhibition Isa Genzken: Retrospective; Kathy Halbreich, ed., Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010, and the exhibition Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010; and Elodie Evers, Magdalena Holzhey, and Gregor Jansen, eds., Leben mit Pop and the exhibition Leben mit Pop.

Against Infographics

By Daniel Rosenberg

When design is excellent, graphics reveal data, writes the infographics guru Edward Tufte. Good information graphics allow the reader to see relationships not apparent in data without visual form. In principle, such graphics do not impose interpretations but, by showing relationships, make interpretations possible.

Against Infographics

By Daniel Rosenberg

When design is excellent, graphics reveal data, writes the infographics guru Edward Tufte. Good information graphics allow the reader to see relationships not apparent in data without visual form. In principle, such graphics do not impose interpretations but, by showing relationships, make interpretations possible.

Introducing a Three-Part Project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present a three-part, three-author project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison.

Introducing a Three-Part Project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison

By Gloria Sutton

Art Journal Open is pleased to present a three-part, three-author project by Natilee Harren, Karl Haendel, and Nate Harrison.

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000

By Natilee Harren

In Natilee Harren’s three-part essay series on issues of appropriation and artistic heritage, she examines episodes in the work of the Los Angeles–based artist Karl Haendel. In “Episode One,” Harren looks closely at Haendel’s Knight’s Heritage, 1963 (2001), which he made as a graduate student, and how it relates to the career and work of the sculptor Anne Truitt (1921–2004). Haendel made his work, a reconstruction of a 1963 work by Truitt, based on photographs, without ever having seen the Truitt sculpture itself.

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000

By Natilee Harren

In Natilee Harren’s three-part essay series on issues of appropriation and artistic heritage, she examines episodes in the work of the Los Angeles–based artist Karl Haendel. In “Episode One,” Harren looks closely at Haendel’s Knight’s Heritage, 1963 (2001), which he made as a graduate student, and how it relates to the career and work of the sculptor Anne Truitt (1921–2004). Haendel made his work, a reconstruction of a 1963 work by Truitt, based on photographs, without ever having seen the Truitt sculpture itself.

Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately)

By Karl Haendel

Artist Karl Haendel has been creating an archive of 35mm slides since 2000, composed of found images and photographs. The approximately 10,000 slides are organized into more than 250 categories and subcategories (from the W section: Wedding Geometry, Weapons, White House, World War I), and some of these slides become the basis for his drawings. Though this archive exists in analogue form, Haendel recognized that the popular GIF format functions in a similar manner to that of the slide projector, and thus created a digital slideshow experience of these source images for Art Journal Open. To view Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately), click on the image inside this post to launch the project.

Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately)

By Karl Haendel

Artist Karl Haendel has been creating an archive of 35mm slides since 2000, composed of found images and photographs. The approximately 10,000 slides are organized into more than 250 categories and subcategories (from the W section: Wedding Geometry, Weapons, White House, World War I), and some of these slides become the basis for his drawings. Though this archive exists in analogue form, Haendel recognized that the popular GIF format functions in a similar manner to that of the slide projector, and thus created a digital slideshow experience of these source images for Art Journal Open. To view Oral Sadism & The Vegetarian Personality (Approximately), click on the image inside this post to launch the project.

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000”

By Nate Harrison

Nate Harrison responds to “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One” by Natilee Harren.

Response to Natilee Harren’s “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One, 2000”

By Nate Harrison

Nate Harrison responds to “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode One” by Natilee Harren.

Bookshelf: Christopher Reed

Christopher Reed shares what he’s reading in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Bookshelf: Christopher Reed

Christopher Reed shares what he’s reading in this new installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Update from the European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum

European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum shares a News & Notes update on their recent activities.

Update from the European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum

European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum shares a News & Notes update on their recent activities.

Update from the Queer Caucus for Art

New in News & Notes: An update from the Queer Caucus for Art.

Update from the Queer Caucus for Art

New in News & Notes: An update from the Queer Caucus for Art.

Bookshelf: Derek Conrad Murray

Derek Conrad Murray shares his reading list in this week’s Art Journal Open Bookshelf.

Bookshelf: Derek Conrad Murray

Derek Conrad Murray shares his reading list in this week’s Art Journal Open Bookshelf.

Report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians

The newest installment of News & Notes is a report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians.

Report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians

The newest installment of News & Notes is a report on the Society of Contemporary Art Historians.

Rewilding: An Emerging History of Common Field

By James McAnally

Common Field was born of a singular moment, a shared time of simmering scarcity matched with an abundance of artist-centric models springing up globally. The emergent network is quickly becoming a central figure within a spectrum of new alternative forms increasingly coming to define a deflated decade.

Rewilding: An Emerging History of Common Field

By James McAnally

Common Field was born of a singular moment, a shared time of simmering scarcity matched with an abundance of artist-centric models springing up globally. The emergent network is quickly becoming a central figure within a spectrum of new alternative forms increasingly coming to define a deflated decade.

Barbarians at the Gates: Contemporary Art and Globalization in Asia

By Sonal Khullar
Sonal Khullar reviews InFlux: Contemporary Art in Asia edited by Parul Dave-Mukherji, Naman P. Ahuja, and Kavita Singh.

Barbarians at the Gates: Contemporary Art and Globalization in Asia

By Sonal Khullar
Sonal Khullar reviews InFlux: Contemporary Art in Asia edited by Parul Dave-Mukherji, Naman P. Ahuja, and Kavita Singh.

The Body is a Location: Math Bass in Conversation with Mia Locks

By Mia Locks

Curator Mia Locks speaks with artist Math Bass about ambiguity, body movement, and the recent exhibition of Bass’s work that Locks curated, Math Bass: Off the Clock, which was on view at MoMA PS1 from May 3 to September 7, 2015.

The Body is a Location: Math Bass in Conversation with Mia Locks

By Mia Locks

Curator Mia Locks speaks with artist Math Bass about ambiguity, body movement, and the recent exhibition of Bass’s work that Locks curated, Math Bass: Off the Clock, which was on view at MoMA PS1 from May 3 to September 7, 2015.

Bookshelf: Suzanne Preston Blier

In the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf project, Suzanne Preston Blier shares what she’s been reading.

Bookshelf: Suzanne Preston Blier

In the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf project, Suzanne Preston Blier shares what she’s been reading.

Bookshelf: Lareese Hall

Lareese Hall shares her “work” and “life” bookshelves in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Bookshelf: Lareese Hall

Lareese Hall shares her “work” and “life” bookshelves in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

How Have New Technologies Shaped the Introductory Art History Classroom? Why Does It Matter? An Update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology

Art Journal Open’s News & Notes section launches with an update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology.

How Have New Technologies Shaped the Introductory Art History Classroom? Why Does It Matter? An Update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology

Art Journal Open’s News & Notes section launches with an update from Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology.

Bookshelf: Paul A. Ranogajec

Paul A. Ranogajec shares his reading list in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Bookshelf: Paul A. Ranogajec

Paul A. Ranogajec shares his reading list in this installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Superficial Thinking: Screen Practices and Screen Architectures

By Swagato Chakravorty
Swagato Chakravorty reviews Surface: Matters of Aesthetics, Materiality, and Media by Giuliana Bruno.

Superficial Thinking: Screen Practices and Screen Architectures

By Swagato Chakravorty
Swagato Chakravorty reviews Surface: Matters of Aesthetics, Materiality, and Media by Giuliana Bruno.

Two for One: robbinschilds in conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch

In the final installment of her three-part interview series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with robbinschilds about site, collaboration, and the process of creating Constructions I–IV, which was commissioned for the 2011 exhibition Temporary Structures: Performing Architecture in Contemporary Art at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum.

Two for One: robbinschilds in conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch

In the final installment of her three-part interview series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with robbinschilds about site, collaboration, and the process of creating Constructions I–IV, which was commissioned for the 2011 exhibition Temporary Structures: Performing Architecture in Contemporary Art at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum.

Bookshelf: Judith Rodenbeck

Judith Rodenbeck shares her summer reading in the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Bookshelf: Judith Rodenbeck

Judith Rodenbeck shares her summer reading in the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series.

Bookshelf: Matthew Israel

In this week’s Bookshelf, Matthew Israel shares what he’s reading.

Bookshelf: Matthew Israel

In this week’s Bookshelf, Matthew Israel shares what he’s reading.

Bookshelf: Steven Nelson

Steven Nelson shares what’s on his bookshelf.

Bookshelf: Steven Nelson

Steven Nelson shares what’s on his bookshelf.

“The Cat Is My Medium”: Notes on the Writing and Art of Carolee Schneemann

By Thyrza Nichols Goodeve

For several years, Carolee Schneemann has presented an ever-evolving performative lecture about her work, starting with drawings she made at the ages of four and seven. I first saw it in 2009 at St. Mark’s Church.

“The Cat Is My Medium”: Notes on the Writing and Art of Carolee Schneemann

By Thyrza Nichols Goodeve

For several years, Carolee Schneemann has presented an ever-evolving performative lecture about her work, starting with drawings she made at the ages of four and seven. I first saw it in 2009 at St. Mark’s Church.

Not Getting There Is Half the Fun: Holidays with Freud

By Elizabeth Legge

Elizabeth Legge reviews Sharon Kivland’s Freud on Holiday series.

Not Getting There Is Half the Fun: Holidays with Freud

By Elizabeth Legge

Elizabeth Legge reviews Sharon Kivland’s Freud on Holiday series.

Bookshelf: Megan A. Sullivan

Megan A. Sullivan shares her summer reading list in this week’s Bookshelf.

Bookshelf: Megan A. Sullivan

Megan A. Sullivan shares her summer reading list in this week’s Bookshelf.

Bookshelf: Lenore Chinn

For the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series, artist Lenore Chinn shares the books on her shelf.

Bookshelf: Lenore Chinn

For the newest installment of Art Journal Open’s Bookshelf series, artist Lenore Chinn shares the books on her shelf.

Bookshelf: Rebecca M. Brown

For the first in Art Journal Open’s new Bookshelf series, Rebecca M. Brown shares what’s on her reading list.

Bookshelf: Rebecca M. Brown

For the first in Art Journal Open’s new Bookshelf series, Rebecca M. Brown shares what’s on her reading list.

Immemorial: The Poetics of AIDS; A Conversation with Rudy Lemcke

By Tina Takemoto
Tina Takemoto and artist Rudy Lemcke discuss his artistic practice and the poetics and politics of AIDS.

Immemorial: The Poetics of AIDS; A Conversation with Rudy Lemcke

By Tina Takemoto
Tina Takemoto and artist Rudy Lemcke discuss his artistic practice and the poetics and politics of AIDS.

Broken Dishes: Kate Gilmore in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
For the second installment of her conversation series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with artist Kate Gilmore about Gilmore’s process of creating Like This, Before (2013), and the importance of breaking things and laughing about it.

Broken Dishes: Kate Gilmore in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
For the second installment of her conversation series, curator Dina Deitsch speaks with artist Kate Gilmore about Gilmore’s process of creating Like This, Before (2013), and the importance of breaking things and laughing about it.

In, Around, and Afterthoughts (On Participation): Photography and Agency in Martha Rosler’s Collaboration with Homeward Bound

By Adair Rounthwaite

It seems obvious to state that photographs play a central role in our ability to study participatory art. Art historians, however, have largely bracketed this as an issue that might be important for how we conceive the politics and aesthetics of participation.

In, Around, and Afterthoughts (On Participation): Photography and Agency in Martha Rosler’s Collaboration with Homeward Bound

By Adair Rounthwaite

It seems obvious to state that photographs play a central role in our ability to study participatory art. Art historians, however, have largely bracketed this as an issue that might be important for how we conceive the politics and aesthetics of participation.

Transnational Fields and the Blindness of the Archive

By Dorota Biczel

Dorota Biczel reviews Making Art Panamerican: Cultural Policy and the Cold War by Claire F. Fox.

Transnational Fields and the Blindness of the Archive

By Dorota Biczel

Dorota Biczel reviews Making Art Panamerican: Cultural Policy and the Cold War by Claire F. Fox.

Primal Matter: An Annotated Bibliography for Ceramics

By Brian Molanphy

This introductory selection of texts on ceramics includes books that offer general foundations as well as essays that exemplify specific investigations.

Primal Matter: An Annotated Bibliography for Ceramics

By Brian Molanphy

This introductory selection of texts on ceramics includes books that offer general foundations as well as essays that exemplify specific investigations.

Floating Cabins and Shifting Landscapes: William Lamson in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
In this interview, curator Dina Deitsch and artist William Lamson discuss the slippery space of video, working with and in nature, and the poetics of floating cabins.

Floating Cabins and Shifting Landscapes: William Lamson in Conversation with Dina Deitsch

By Dina Deitsch
In this interview, curator Dina Deitsch and artist William Lamson discuss the slippery space of video, working with and in nature, and the poetics of floating cabins.

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #3

by Mike Maizels

As the first pair of artists in this series examined the semantics of local places, and the second explored the possibility of picturing the world in totality, both artists in the final pairing investigate the question of geographic epistemology—how do the materials facts of the external world become the objects of systematic human understanding?

The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0; Comparison #3

by Mike Maizels

As the first pair of artists in this series examined the semantics of local places, and the second explored the possibility of picturing the world in totality, both artists in the final pairing investigate the question of geographic epistemology—how do the materials facts of the external world become the objects of systematic human understanding?

Objects Made Black

by Sampada Aranke

Sampada Aranke reviews Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America by Huey Copeland.

Objects Made Black

by Sampada Aranke

Sampada Aranke reviews Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America by Huey Copeland.