Chuck Smith,  Forrest Bess: The Key to the Riddle

The Aesthetic Gold of a Ravished Spouse of the Godhead

Chuck Smith. Forrest Bess: Key to the Riddle. New York: Power House Books, 2013. 168 pp., 125 color ills. $40 Claire Elliott and Robert Gober. Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible. Houston: The Menil Collection, 2013. 112 pp., 71 color ills.

Chuck Smith,  Forrest Bess: The Key to the Riddle

The Aesthetic Gold of a Ravished Spouse of the Godhead

Chuck Smith. Forrest Bess: Key to the Riddle. New York: Power House Books, 2013. 168 pp., 125 color ills. $40 Claire Elliott and Robert Gober. Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible. Houston: The Menil Collection, 2013. 112 pp., 71 color ills.

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Counter to Type

In the Spring 2014 issue of Art Journal, Karen L. Schiff created an artists’s project, Counter to Type. Working from the typography on the covers and selected interior pages of the journal, she used colored pencils to draw on transparent

Schiff2

Counter to Type

In the Spring 2014 issue of Art Journal, Karen L. Schiff created an artists’s project, Counter to Type. Working from the typography on the covers and selected interior pages of the journal, she used colored pencils to draw on transparent

Nell Andrew, Sophie Taueber-Arp, Free Vertical-Horizontal Rhythms (Rythmes verticaux-horizontaux libres), 1919, gouache, 11 15⁄16 x 8 9⁄16 in. (30.3 x 21.8 cm). Stiftung Hans Arp und Sophie Taeuber Arp e.V., inv. 003.205 (artwork in the public domain; photograph provided by Stiftung Hans Arp und Sophie Taeuber Arp)

Dada Dance: Sophie Taeuber’s Visceral Abstraction

The Photograph In a recent landmark exhibition on the intersection of art and dance, Danser sa vie, the Centre Georges Pompidou displayed an enigmatic photograph identified as the artist Sophie Taeuber dancing at the Cabaret Voltaire in 1916. It is

Nell Andrew, Sophie Taueber-Arp, Free Vertical-Horizontal Rhythms (Rythmes verticaux-horizontaux libres), 1919, gouache, 11 15⁄16 x 8 9⁄16 in. (30.3 x 21.8 cm). Stiftung Hans Arp und Sophie Taeuber Arp e.V., inv. 003.205 (artwork in the public domain; photograph provided by Stiftung Hans Arp und Sophie Taeuber Arp)

Dada Dance: Sophie Taeuber’s Visceral Abstraction

The Photograph In a recent landmark exhibition on the intersection of art and dance, Danser sa vie, the Centre Georges Pompidou displayed an enigmatic photograph identified as the artist Sophie Taeuber dancing at the Cabaret Voltaire in 1916. It is

Senga Nengudi, R.S.V.P. 1, 1977/2003,  nylon mesh and sand, 10 pieces, dimensions variable. Museum of Modern Art, New York (artwork © Senga Nengudi; photograph provided by Thomas Erben Gallery, New York)

Sexing Sculpture: New Approaches to Theorizing the Object

This forum, which originated as a panel at the 2013 Annual Conference of the College Art Association in New York, developed from the following question: how do sculptural practices uphold or, conversely, equivocate the certainties of gendered and sexual embodiment?

Senga Nengudi, R.S.V.P. 1, 1977/2003,  nylon mesh and sand, 10 pieces, dimensions variable. Museum of Modern Art, New York (artwork © Senga Nengudi; photograph provided by Thomas Erben Gallery, New York)

Sexing Sculpture: New Approaches to Theorizing the Object

This forum, which originated as a panel at the 2013 Annual Conference of the College Art Association in New York, developed from the following question: how do sculptural practices uphold or, conversely, equivocate the certainties of gendered and sexual embodiment?

Reviews 3 Rivers Johnson TOC

Through the Looking-Glass, Darkly

Ken Johnson. Are You Experienced? How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art. New York: Prestel, 2011. 232 pp., 150 color ills., 10 b/w. $49.95 David S. Rubin, ed. Psychedelic: Optical and Visionary Art since the 1960s. Exh. cat. Cambridge, MA: MIT

Reviews 3 Rivers Johnson TOC

Through the Looking-Glass, Darkly

Ken Johnson. Are You Experienced? How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art. New York: Prestel, 2011. 232 pp., 150 color ills., 10 b/w. $49.95 David S. Rubin, ed. Psychedelic: Optical and Visionary Art since the 1960s. Exh. cat. Cambridge, MA: MIT

Heather Cassils, Becoming an Image Performance Still No. 1, Edgy Women Festival, Montreal 2013  (artwork © Heather Cassils; 
photograph by the artist and Alejandro Santiago).

Queer Formalisms: Jennifer Doyle and David Getsy in Conversation

This conversation took place via e-mail over the course of autumn 2013. David Getsy: The context of a group of essays on sculpture, sexuality, and abstraction prompts me to start this conversation by talking about how we both write about

Heather Cassils, Becoming an Image Performance Still No. 1, Edgy Women Festival, Montreal 2013  (artwork © Heather Cassils; 
photograph by the artist and Alejandro Santiago).

Queer Formalisms: Jennifer Doyle and David Getsy in Conversation

This conversation took place via e-mail over the course of autumn 2013. David Getsy: The context of a group of essays on sculpture, sexuality, and abstraction prompts me to start this conversation by talking about how we both write about

Catherine Opie, Karin, 2009,  inkjet print, 11 x 11 in. (27.9 x 27.9 cm) (photograph © Catherine Opie, provided by Regen Projects, Los Angeles)

Karin Higa: A Collage of Remembrances

Well before I met Karin Higa, I knew of her as a curator of Asian American art, a prominent voice in the contemporary art world, and an author whose writings I frequently assigned to students. Though Karin would eventually pursue

Catherine Opie, Karin, 2009,  inkjet print, 11 x 11 in. (27.9 x 27.9 cm) (photograph © Catherine Opie, provided by Regen Projects, Los Angeles)

Karin Higa: A Collage of Remembrances

Well before I met Karin Higa, I knew of her as a curator of Asian American art, a prominent voice in the contemporary art world, and an author whose writings I frequently assigned to students. Though Karin would eventually pursue

Eadward Muybridge, Pi-Wi-Ack, Valley of the Yosemite (Shower of Stars), “Vernal Fall,” 400 Feet Fall, No. 29, 1872, wet-plate collodion photograph (photograph in the public domain)

“A Clear Day and No Memories”: Neurology, Philosophy, and Analogy in Kerry Tribe’s H.M.

I delivered a version of this essay as a lecture in Utrecht, on May 26, 2011, for the Performance & Philosophy working group’s panel “Enacting Pasts & Presents in Philosophy & Performance” at the Performance Studies international conference #17: Camillo

Eadward Muybridge, Pi-Wi-Ack, Valley of the Yosemite (Shower of Stars), “Vernal Fall,” 400 Feet Fall, No. 29, 1872, wet-plate collodion photograph (photograph in the public domain)

“A Clear Day and No Memories”: Neurology, Philosophy, and Analogy in Kerry Tribe’s H.M.

I delivered a version of this essay as a lecture in Utrecht, on May 26, 2011, for the Performance & Philosophy working group’s panel “Enacting Pasts & Presents in Philosophy & Performance” at the Performance Studies international conference #17: Camillo

Modernism, Essentialism, and “Racial Art” in America

Jacqueline Francis. Making Race: Modernism and “Racial Art” in America. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2012. 256 pp., 12 color ills., 47 b/w. $40 paper ShiPu Wang. Becoming American? The Art and Identity Crisis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi. Honolulu: University of

Modernism, Essentialism, and “Racial Art” in America

Jacqueline Francis. Making Race: Modernism and “Racial Art” in America. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2012. 256 pp., 12 color ills., 47 b/w. $40 paper ShiPu Wang. Becoming American? The Art and Identity Crisis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi. Honolulu: University of

Tammy Rae Carland, Galz Living Room, MWMF, from Outpost, 2004, color photograph, 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61cm) (artwork © Tammy Rae Carland)

Sharing an Archive of Feelings: A Conversation

Tammy Rae Carland: As I remember, we met in 1995 in Portland, Oregon, through our musician girlfriends. I had just finished graduate school and had gone to New York, to the Whitney Independent Study Program, and I was about to

Tammy Rae Carland, Galz Living Room, MWMF, from Outpost, 2004, color photograph, 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61cm) (artwork © Tammy Rae Carland)

Sharing an Archive of Feelings: A Conversation

Tammy Rae Carland: As I remember, we met in 1995 in Portland, Oregon, through our musician girlfriends. I had just finished graduate school and had gone to New York, to the Whitney Independent Study Program, and I was about to

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Administered Occupation: Art and Politics at the 7th Berlin Biennale

In one of his best-known videos, the artist Artur Zmijewski is seen trying to persuade a former Nazi concentration camp prisoner to “renew” the number tattooed on the man’s forearm. In another film, Berek, naked adults play a game of

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Administered Occupation: Art and Politics at the 7th Berlin Biennale

In one of his best-known videos, the artist Artur Zmijewski is seen trying to persuade a former Nazi concentration camp prisoner to “renew” the number tattooed on the man’s forearm. In another film, Berek, naked adults play a game of

YJL-580

Women in Downtown Theater: Producing Your Own Work

The panel discussion in this video took place at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art on March 11, 2012. I put the public presentation together after receiving numerous e-mails from young female theater-makers who wanted advice

YJL-580

Women in Downtown Theater: Producing Your Own Work

The panel discussion in this video took place at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art on March 11, 2012. I put the public presentation together after receiving numerous e-mails from young female theater-makers who wanted advice

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Outtakes: California Company Town

I finished the film California Company Town in 2008. The film was a way of looking at the fallibility of history, to be able to depict a process of political thought against the markings it makes on landscape. Most of

schmitt-CCT-still-580

Outtakes: California Company Town

I finished the film California Company Town in 2008. The film was a way of looking at the fallibility of history, to be able to depict a process of political thought against the markings it makes on landscape. Most of

granat-270

The Hour Blew

The digital form still feels new to me, and slightly intangible when I use it. Nevertheless, I use it constantly—though its workings remain unclear. That confusion can be liberating. It creates layers and dimensions I don’t understand and cannot visualize.

granat-270

The Hour Blew

The digital form still feels new to me, and slightly intangible when I use it. Nevertheless, I use it constantly—though its workings remain unclear. That confusion can be liberating. It creates layers and dimensions I don’t understand and cannot visualize.

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Mining the Postwar Japanese Vanguard: Miwako Tezuka Speaks with Doryun Chong

Doryun Chong: Tell me how your work on Jikken Kōbō [Experimental Workshop] started. Miwako Tezuka: I specialize in contemporary Japanese art, which basically means post-1945. While doing some ground research, I realized that in the history of post-1945 Japanese art,

030_CAA_FA11-580

Mining the Postwar Japanese Vanguard: Miwako Tezuka Speaks with Doryun Chong

Doryun Chong: Tell me how your work on Jikken Kōbō [Experimental Workshop] started. Miwako Tezuka: I specialize in contemporary Japanese art, which basically means post-1945. While doing some ground research, I realized that in the history of post-1945 Japanese art,

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OCCUPOLOGY, SWARMOLOGY, WHATEVEROLOGY: the city of (dis)order versus the people’s archive

i The archive, with its icy temperature and motionless repose, may seem like an unlikely place to begin thinking about Occupy Wall Street (OWS), a dynamic and still-unfolding phenomenon whose precise nature appears impossible to determine, let alone file away

6-Maha-Maamoun-Sholette270

OCCUPOLOGY, SWARMOLOGY, WHATEVEROLOGY: the city of (dis)order versus the people’s archive

i The archive, with its icy temperature and motionless repose, may seem like an unlikely place to begin thinking about Occupy Wall Street (OWS), a dynamic and still-unfolding phenomenon whose precise nature appears impossible to determine, let alone file away

Three Questions: Helen Molesworth Speaks with Taylor Davis

This conversation took place at the ICA Boston on April 28, 2010. Jill Medvedow, director of the ICA, asked the artist Taylor Davis to interview the then newly appointed chief curator Helen Molesworth.

Taylor Davis: I was looking at curate and “curate” came up, the archaic definition of a minister with pastoral responsibility. I was surprised because the stereotypes—a soft-handed, rosy-cheeked Anglican biking from cottage to cottage in some BBC version of the English countryside, and the slim-hipped, couture-wearing tastemaker jetting from one urban hotspot to another—couldn’t be farther apart.

Then I started thinking about artists you’ve worked with, and a few came to my mind immediately (Sharon Hayes, William Pope.L, Moyra Davey, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and so on), and exhibitions you’ve created so far (Work Ethic, ACT UP New York: Activism, Art, and the AIDS Crisis, 1987–1993, Part Object Part Sculpture, and many more), and the perceived distance between responsibility to a community and curating contemporary art collapsed. I like this collapse very much. My questions come from thinking about possible similarities between what seem to be two very different cultural leaders.

Three Questions: Helen Molesworth Speaks with Taylor Davis

This conversation took place at the ICA Boston on April 28, 2010. Jill Medvedow, director of the ICA, asked the artist Taylor Davis to interview the then newly appointed chief curator Helen Molesworth.

Taylor Davis: I was looking at curate and “curate” came up, the archaic definition of a minister with pastoral responsibility. I was surprised because the stereotypes—a soft-handed, rosy-cheeked Anglican biking from cottage to cottage in some BBC version of the English countryside, and the slim-hipped, couture-wearing tastemaker jetting from one urban hotspot to another—couldn’t be farther apart.

Then I started thinking about artists you’ve worked with, and a few came to my mind immediately (Sharon Hayes, William Pope.L, Moyra Davey, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and so on), and exhibitions you’ve created so far (Work Ethic, ACT UP New York: Activism, Art, and the AIDS Crisis, 1987–1993, Part Object Part Sculpture, and many more), and the perceived distance between responsibility to a community and curating contemporary art collapsed. I like this collapse very much. My questions come from thinking about possible similarities between what seem to be two very different cultural leaders.

098_CAA_SU11

Craft Class

By the time Rozsika Parker published Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine in 1984, the following overtly feminist “stitched” works had already been made: Faith Wilding’s Womb Room, 1972; Harmony Hammond’s Presence V, also made in 1972; Faith Ringgold’s Zora and Fish, 1975; and Judy Chicago’s monumental Dinner Party, 1979—for which she employed extremely traditional fiber and ceramic craft techniques.

098_CAA_SU11

Craft Class

By the time Rozsika Parker published Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine in 1984, the following overtly feminist “stitched” works had already been made: Faith Wilding’s Womb Room, 1972; Harmony Hammond’s Presence V, also made in 1972; Faith Ringgold’s Zora and Fish, 1975; and Judy Chicago’s monumental Dinner Party, 1979—for which she employed extremely traditional fiber and ceramic craft techniques.

Liz Magic Laser, Flight, 2010, performance, MoMA PS1, Long Island City, April 10, 2010 (artwork © Liz Magic Laser; photograph by Mia Tramz, provided by Derek Eller Gallery). The performance was developed in collaboration with actors Lindsey Andersen, Nic Grelli, Elizabeth Hodur, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Lia Woertendyke.

InterAct: a reenacted interview

If the world’s a stage, then Liz Magic Laser becomes its director and all passersby are forced to perform. In 2009 Laser staged chase; the following year she produced Flight: in both works, action was registered on video and video begat action. To produce Interact, this project for Art Journal, Laser and her cast met at the East River Park Amphitheatre on two mornings last autumn: the first time to talk in the bleachers and the second time to relive the first conversation on stage.

Liz Magic Laser, Flight, 2010, performance, MoMA PS1, Long Island City, April 10, 2010 (artwork © Liz Magic Laser; photograph by Mia Tramz, provided by Derek Eller Gallery). The performance was developed in collaboration with actors Lindsey Andersen, Nic Grelli, Elizabeth Hodur, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Lia Woertendyke.

InterAct: a reenacted interview

If the world’s a stage, then Liz Magic Laser becomes its director and all passersby are forced to perform. In 2009 Laser staged chase; the following year she produced Flight: in both works, action was registered on video and video begat action. To produce Interact, this project for Art Journal, Laser and her cast met at the East River Park Amphitheatre on two mornings last autumn: the first time to talk in the bleachers and the second time to relive the first conversation on stage.

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X jxm vlr rpb pelria ilpb vlr

On the occasion of the upcoming release of the multimedia e-book version of Waiting for Godot in New Orleans: A field Guide (co-published by Badlands Unlimited and Creative Time Books), Paul Chan writes about some of the secrets hidden in plain sight within the maps and notes that make up the documentation of this multi-faceted work.

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X jxm vlr rpb pelria ilpb vlr

On the occasion of the upcoming release of the multimedia e-book version of Waiting for Godot in New Orleans: A field Guide (co-published by Badlands Unlimited and Creative Time Books), Paul Chan writes about some of the secrets hidden in plain sight within the maps and notes that make up the documentation of this multi-faceted work.

Wojnarowicz-1987_Street-Kid

David Wojnarowicz: Against His Vanishing

David Wojnarowicz was thrust into the national spotlight in 1989 when the National Endowment for the Arts rescinded its financial support for the catalogue accompanying the exhibition Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing, curated by Nan Goldin for Artists Space. I described …

Wojnarowicz-1987_Street-Kid

David Wojnarowicz: Against His Vanishing

David Wojnarowicz was thrust into the national spotlight in 1989 when the National Endowment for the Arts rescinded its financial support for the catalogue accompanying the exhibition Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing, curated by Nan Goldin for Artists Space. I described …

aj-mess-270

Art Journal at Fifty

This is the second essay the College Art Association has published entitled “Art Journal at Fifty.” The first, by CAA president Ruth Weisberg, was published in the magazine in the winter of 1991. The present essay is partly about how

aj-mess-270

Art Journal at Fifty

This is the second essay the College Art Association has published entitled “Art Journal at Fifty.” The first, by CAA president Ruth Weisberg, was published in the magazine in the winter of 1991. The present essay is partly about how

bakers

A Baker’s Dozen from the Archives

To complement Howard Singerman’s comprehensive and insightful overview of Art Journal’s rather eccentric history, we’ve asked the editorial board and a few friends to pick their favorite articles, essays, reviews, and artists’ projects from issues past. Some feature familiar names attached to much-cited touchstones, while others, we hope, will come as a surprise.

bakers

A Baker’s Dozen from the Archives

To complement Howard Singerman’s comprehensive and insightful overview of Art Journal’s rather eccentric history, we’ve asked the editorial board and a few friends to pick their favorite articles, essays, reviews, and artists’ projects from issues past. Some feature familiar names attached to much-cited touchstones, while others, we hope, will come as a surprise.

An Interview with David Wojnarowicz

Last November, the late artist David Wojnarowicz reemerged at the center of international attention when the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery removed his video A Fire in My Belly from the exhibition Hide/Seek. The Smithsonian Institution’s decision to succumb to pressure from outspoken conservative groups including the Catholic League ignited international outcry around censorship, gay rights, and the role of art institutions in protecting free speech. In light of the continuing urgency of these issues, Art Journal is pleased to present this previously unpublished 1990 interview between the artist and Steven Dubin.

An Interview with David Wojnarowicz

Last November, the late artist David Wojnarowicz reemerged at the center of international attention when the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery removed his video A Fire in My Belly from the exhibition Hide/Seek. The Smithsonian Institution’s decision to succumb to pressure from outspoken conservative groups including the Catholic League ignited international outcry around censorship, gay rights, and the role of art institutions in protecting free speech. In light of the continuing urgency of these issues, Art Journal is pleased to present this previously unpublished 1990 interview between the artist and Steven Dubin.